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Jennifer Foster

From Rubble to Refuge: Advancing sustainability of the Leslie Street Spit

From Rubble to Refuge: Advancing sustainability of the Leslie Street Spit

The Leslie Street Spit is a 500-hectare construction waste dump that also functions as an ecologically rich urban landscape feature. Since the 1950s, trucks have been depositing construction waste along this narrow landform, to the point where it now extends 5 kilometers from downtown Toronto into Lake Ontario.   Due to the site’s auspicious location

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Rubble to Refuge: Toronto's Leslie Street Spit

Rubble to Refuge: Toronto's Leslie Street Spit

Principal Investigator: Jennifer Foster/Co-Investigator: Gail Fraser. Funding: SSHRC Partnership Engage Grant. Term: 2020-2024. The project unites established researchers from York University with conservation managers from the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and students to address pressing issues on Toronto's Leslie Street Spit, one of Canada's most celebrated "urban wilderness" landscapes. It combines innovative methodologies

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Rubble to Refuge: Toronto's Leslie Street Spit

Rubble to Refuge: Toronto's Leslie Street Spit

The project unites established researchers from York University with conservation managers from the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and students to address pressing issues on Toronto's Leslie Street Spit, one of Canada's most celebrated "urban wilderness" landscapes. It combines innovative methodologies to develop an advanced understanding of human relationships with the Leslie Street Spit

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From Rubble to Refuge: Ecological Restoration and the Aggregate Product Cycle in Toronto, Canada

From Rubble to Refuge: Ecological Restoration and the Aggregate Product Cycle in Toronto, Canada

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) The research aimed to advance knowledge and understanding of the relationship between urban industrialization and environment naturalization in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). It used the aggregate product cycle as a case study to explore the reconstitution of the urban landscape and the ways aesthetic conceptualizations of urban

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