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Course Offerings in EUC

EUC offers hundreds of dynamic and engaging courses for EUC, York U and Visiting Students. This list will provide you insight into the breadth of studies your program will include.

Please Note: Not all courses listed on this page are offered each academic term. We encourage you to review the York University Course Website for Offerings each term before choosing a course to enroll in. We also recommend meeting with our academic advisors to ensure the courses you are selecting meet your degree requirements before enrolling.

Courses for Undergraduate Studies

Earth in Our Hands: Introduction to Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 1000 6.00)

This course is designed to provide students with an introductory perspective or framework of understanding for environmental studies at the broadest level. The course introduces students to environmental issues, using the urgent, emerging prospect of the fate of the "Earth in our hands" as the main organizing ethical, scientific and practical theme throughout the year.

The World Today: An Introduction to World Geography (EU GEOG 1000 6.00)

This course asks you to think critically and geographically about the world in which we live and provides context for understanding contemporary social, political, economic, and ecological changes and how you fit into these larger processes. In addition to focusing on pressing issues particular to individual regions, we stress a variety of topics including race and ethnicity, economic inequality, indigenous peoples, migration, colonialism, climate change, globalization, protest movements, food politics, conservation, and the politics of energy. The course draws upon powerful geographic concepts to examine these topics and link you-as a student, a consumer, a citizen, a worker and a traveler-to the changing world around you.

Introduction to Environmental Documentaries (EU ENVS 1010 3.00)

The course will introduce students to how environmentalists are using documentary films for speaking truth to power. Topics will include how and why documentary films are made and the roles they play in social change efforts on environmental issues. Students will learn how to create their own digital media projects in various documentary formats.

An introduction to Sustainable Food Systems: Eating our way to a better world (EU ENVS 1011 3.00)

Through a Canadian lens, the course introduces students to the problems of our global food system, and the opportunities to improve it.  Using many analytical frameworks  and concepts from different disciplines, students examine critically the dimensions of a food system that is health promoting and environmentally sustainable and explore transitional strategies to bring them to reality. The course will give students a strong foundation on which to undertake further or specialised learning in Food Studies, a clear and growing interest for students and a priority for the Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change.

Taking Action: Engaging People and the Environment (EU ENVS 1200 6.00)

Students learn to identify, research, and act on local/global issues of environmental and social justice. Working in small groups, they develop basic skills in collaborative research, social analysis, action planning and creative communications. The workshop introduces them to the praxis pedagogy of the program, connects them to organizations addressing the issues, and culminates in actions and presentations.

Physical Geography (EU GEOG 1400 6.00)

A study of the physical-biotic environment through a consideration of the character and processes of its components - atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere - and of the spatial distributions which reflect interaction among these components.Course credit exclusions: SC/GEOG 1400 6.00.

Human Geography (EU GEOG 1410 6.00)

An introduction to the study of human geography which puts emphasis on geographical aspects of population, culture, society and economy. Detailed examples are studied in tutorials.

Introduction to Environmental Science: The Web of Life (EU ENVS 1500 6.00)

An introduction to the elements of physics, chemistry, biology and ecology that are necessary for the study of environmental problems. It also acquaints students with techniques (including computer techniques) for the description, organization and display of quantitative data.

Environmental Writing / Writing the Environment (EU ENVS 1800 6.00)

Introduces students to a range of modes of writing in environmental studies. In the process of reading, discussing, and practicing different kinds of environmental writing, students will develop a variety of writing skills in addition to an appreciation of writing as an important form of environmental action. The course also considers writing in relation to oral traditions and newer technologies. Prerequisite: First-year specialty or permission of the Instructor. Note: This course is not intended for ESL students.

Environmental Politics, Justice and Arts (EU ENVS 2000 6.00)

How do we change the world? How do we construct a just society in creative ways? This Area focuses on facing today’s environmental challenges through politics, art, philosophy, education and media. You will examine the relationships between humans and environments using literary texts, digital images, pop art and performance. Study how environmental inequalities arise, including class, indigenous, racial and gender dimensions. Learn methods for researching environmental justice issues, and strategies for addressing them both locally and globally. Develop analytical, artistic, writing, collaborative and presentation skills to envision and realize a better environmental future.Sample topics include: environmental racism and justice movements; environmental ethics; digital art and the environment; environmental education; human-animal relations; environmental literature; indigenous sovereignty; human and gender rights; technology, science and politics; culture and global media; sustainable development; the political economy of international development; health equity; climate justice; sexuality and gender-based activism.       Prerequisite: second-year Standing or by Permission of the Instructor.

Quantitative Methods in Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 2009 3.00)

An introduction to the skills necessary to pursue and understand statistical data analysis. Topics include: graphing, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, an introduction to probability, statistical inference, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression. Statistical software will be utilized to perform data analysis on the computer.   Prerequisite: Second-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.

The End of the Earth as We Know It: Global Environmental Change (EU GEOG 2030 3.00)

This course explores how human society has transformed the earth system and investigates the social, economic and political implications of contemporary environmental change. Topics include deforestation, climate change, biodiversity loss and natural disasters such as hurricanes, flooding and drought. Internet access is required.Recommended prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 and AP/GEOG 1410 6.00.

Historical Geography (EU GEOG 2060 3.00)

An exploration of the content of and approaches to historical geography, with a focus on major historical shifts in the geography and geographic knowledge of human beings, such as imperialism, mass migration and urbanization.

Empire, State, & Power: An Introduction to Political Geography (EU GEOG 2070 3.00)

"This course explores the reciprocal links between geography and political processes at the global, national and local levels. Political geography asks us to understand the historical and contemporary relationships between power and space, focusing on empires, nations, states, territory, and borders. More broadly, the course highlights the importance of space and place for processes of domination.Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 2050 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013), AP/GEOG 2070 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013).PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2070 3.00.

Everyday Life: Introduction to Cultural Geography (EU GEOG 2075 3.00)

Critically explores 'everyday life' and the spaces and places through which it is experiences, reproduced, represented and negotiated. Topics covered include, geographies of mobility; urban parks; geographies of capitalism; geographies of cinema; surveillance; geographies of boredom and silence; geographies of deliberation and everyday sites of citizenship and identity formation.

Money, Power and Space: Introduction to Economic Geography (EU GEOG 2105 3.00)

"Introduces the field of economic geography, addressing spatial dimensions of: wealth and poverty; structures of production and commodity chains; patterns and processes of retailing and consumption; the role of states in economic governance; the struggles of organized labour; the organization of transnational corporations; and, the ways in which ethnic identity and gender shape economic life.Prerequisites: One of: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, AP/GEOG 2500 6.00,or written permission of the Instructor. Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 2100 6.00. Previously offered as: AP/GEOG 2105 6.00.

Introduction to Natural History (EU ENVS 2120 3.00)

An introduction to the world of natural history. Students will be encouraged to observe and question the natural world and learn how historically inquisitive naturalists have made important discoveries. Some emphasis will be placed on recognizing and appreciating biodiversity in the Toronto area. Prerequisite: Second-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.

Community Arts for Social Change (EU ENVS 2122 3.00)

An introduction to community-based creative approaches integral to social change in different historical and cultural contexts. These practices and methods are examined in terms of their form, content, production, and reception from interdisciplinary perspectives.  Prerequisite: Second-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.PRIOR TO WINTER 2017: course credit exclusion: FA/FACS 2122 3.00.

Foundations of Urban and Regional Environments: Analysis, Planning, and Design (EU ENVS 2200 6.00)

Focuses on the interrelationships of the ecological, social, built and organizational environments within the urban and regional setting. It provides a critical understanding of urban and regional environments along with a solutions-based approach to addressing urban and regional issues with an explicitly environmental perspective. With the Greater Toronto Area as a field laboratory, there will be an emphasis on application and involvement. Prerequisite: Second-year standing or permission of the Instructor. Previously offered as: ES/ENVS 2200 3.00.

Urban Geography (EU GEOG 2220 6.00)

In a world where over 50 per cent of the population lives in urban areas, cities play a significant role in shaping the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental conditions of people's everyday lives. This course introduces the geographical literature on the urbanization process in historical and contemporary perspective. It provides students with a necessary general survey of the characteristics of urban processes and patterns, urban systems and structure, and urban social issues from a geographical perspective.

Identities: Introduction to Social Geography (EU GEOG 2305 3.00)

Examines the production, reproduction and mediation of identities through space and place at various scales. The course will introduce students to the complex relations between space, place and identity, and ask them to think critically about the spaces of their own lives.

Introduction to Refugee and Migration Studies (EU GEOG 2310 6.00)

An introduction to the problem of refugees: conceptual issues (definitions, refugee rights, ethical norms), the historical background, Canadian policy and the issues in specific areas of the world - Africa, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the Middle East.Prerequisite: A 1000-level social science course. Course credit exclusions: AP/REI 2310 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013), AP/SOSC 1130 9.00, AP/SOSC 1139 9.00.PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: A 1000-level social science course. Course credit exclusions: AS/SOSC 1130 9.00, AS/SOSC 1139 9.00, AK/SOSC 2000 6.00.

Geoinformatics: Introduction (EU GEOG 2340 3.00)

This course covers fundamental concepts and approaches of geographical information systems, remote sensing and global positioning systems. Students also acquire knowledge and skills in descriptive statistics, map design and interpretation, and basic computer cartography. Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor. Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 2350 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), SC/GEOG 2350 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), LE/EATS 2610 2.00 (prior to Summer 2013), LE/ENG 2110 2.00 (prior to Summer 2013).PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor. Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 2350 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), SC/GEOG 2350 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), SC/EATS 2610 2.00, SC/ENG 2110 2.00.

Foundations of Environmental Management: Policy, Resources and Conservation (EU ENVS 2400 6.00)

Drawing on the natural and social sciences, this course examines the role of policy and management strategies in addressing environmental, nature resource and conservation challenges, in ways supportive of sustainable development. It provides an overview of the concepts, knowledge and skills that are needed to be effective in environmental policy and management in government, business and not-for-profit sectors.  Prerequisite: Second-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Previously offered as: ES/ENVS 2400 3.00.

The Hydrosphere (EU GEOG 2400 6.00)

Examines the physical processes and the environmental factors that govern the movement of water and energy in lakes, rivers, oceans and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Boundary-layer climates and mechanisms of water movement and storage are emphasized. Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00.

Introductory Statistical Analysis in Geography (EU GEOG 2420 3.00)

This introductory course aims to provide a working knowledge of several statistical techniques which are widely used in many branches of geography. Some attention is also given to broader questions concerning the nature of the scientific method. Prerequisites: 24 credits successfully completed. This course is intended primarily for students majoring in geography and is normally taken during the second-year of study. Course credit exclusions: AP/ECON 2500 3.00, AP/POLS 3300 6.00, AP/SOCI 3030 6.00, HH/KINE 2050 3.00, HH/KINE 3150 3.00, HH/PSYC 2020 6.00, HH/PSYC 2021 3.00, SC/BIOL 2060 3.00, SC/MATH 2560 3.00, SC/MATH 2565 3.00, SC/MATH 2570 3.00.

Introduction to Vegetation and Soils (EU GEOG 2500 3.00)

An introduction to the structure and functioning of vegetation and soil systems, emphasizing local patterns and processes, methods of description and sampling, dynamic processes, response to environmental change and human disturbance. Field work is emphasized in laboratories. One-day field trip. Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or ES/ENVS 2500 6.00.

Geomorphology I (EU GEOG 2600 3.00)

This course concentrates on basic principles and fundamental concepts in geomorphology, including energy flows in geomorphic systems, hill slope forms and materials, weathering and landforms, and drainage basin geomorphology and hydrology (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples).Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or LE/EATS 1010 3.00.PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/EATS 1010 3.0.

Geomorphology II (EU GEOG 2610 3.00)

This course concentrates on geomorphic processes and landforms (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples). Five main areas are explored: fluvial forms and processes; the glaciation of Canada and glacial mechanics; periglaciation; aeolian processes; and coastal processes and landforms. Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2600 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/SC/GEOG 2600 3.00. Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 2610 3.00, AS/SC/GEOG 3600 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005).

Environmental Ethics and Epistemology (EU ENVS 3000 3.00)

This course identifies, examines, and compares ethical perspectives from diverse traditions with a particular focus on the interplay of ethics and epistemology, and metaphysical issues and their relationship to underlying cultural, environmental, and spiritual values. Individual ethics and practical applications in "living a good life" will be explored. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Qualitative Methods in Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 3010 3.00)

After comparing qualitative and quantitative research methods and their respective philosophical foundations and assessing their compatibility, students will examine various survey of qualitative research which will include conventional methods such as participant observation field research; participatory action research; arts-based research; Indigenous, feminist and anti-oppressive methods. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Geography of Canada (EU GEOG 3010 6.00)

A study of basic physical and human geographical patterns in Canada, stressing the processes which produced the latter, and selected characteristics of major Canadian regions. Prerequisite: One of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00.

Geographical Transformation of the Caribbean Islands (EU GEOG 3020 6.00)

This course analyzes the geographic status of the Caribbean islands. It examines how interactions between natural-environmental factors and human activities since the beginnings of settlement account for the current appearance, character, problems and prospects for individual islands and for the region. Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 2020 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2020 6.00.

Urban Environmental Justice (EU GEOG 3040 3.00)

Examines how processes of urbanization result in the unequal spatial and social distribution of environmental goods (e.g., pollution, toxic waste, landfills) in North American cities. It investigates the ways in which cities, as dynamic human ecologies in their own right, have increasingly become sites of environmental contestation, and explores the articulation of social justice, urbanization and environmentalism. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3891 3.00.

Nature, Power and Society (EU GEOG 3050 3.00)

Examines the geographic understanding of nature-society relationships. We review popular and scientific theories of environmental change, conflict and conservation, and examine the role that politics and power play in shaping ecological problems and issues. Prerequisites: 54 credits completed including at least three credits in GEOG or permission of the Instructor.

Post-Colonial Geographies (EU GEOG 3060 3.00)

This course examines the particular landscapes produced by colonialism and the struggles to move beyond it. Attention is paid to the use of space and place as mechanisms of control and liberation. Examples are international, and concern fictional and non-fictional landscapes.  Prerequisite: 54 credits successfully completed. Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: 54 credits successfully completed. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3060 3.00.

Gender, Population,and Migration (EU GEOG 3070 3.00)

The course examines the characteristics, trends, and problems in the growth and distribution of human populations. It analyzes the interrelationships between fertility, mortality, migration, and socioeconomic development in various regions of the world, paying special attention to the gender perspectives of the observed relationships. Prerequisite: 54 credits successfully completed.

Gender, Population and Migration (EU GEOG 3070 6.00)

Characteristics and problems in growth and distribution of human populations, including birth, fertility and death rates, population growth and environment, globalization and migration and population control policies. Gender perspectives are emphasized. Prerequisite: 54 credits successfully completed. Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 4070 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012).

Reading Landscapes Through Time (EU GEOG 3080 3.00)

Cultural landscapes change over time. This can result from changes in legal tenure, cultural adaptation, changes in the economic base or historical events. This course considers landscapes in various countries in chronological sequence.

Systems Thinking in Environmental Studies: Theory and Methodologies (EU ENVS 3081 3.00)

This course addresses fundamentals of general and complex systems thinking (such as general systems theory, complex adaptive systems, chaos theory) major paradigms in systems thinking (functionalist, interpretive, emancipatory, postmodern), and their associated methodologies and applications in environmental studies.

Land and People: Historical Geographies of Modern Ireland (EU GEOG 3081 3.00)

This course explores selected themes on the historical geography of Ireland, concentrating on the period since 1600. Attention is paid to the role and impact of economic, cultural, and political processes that have shaped Irish landscapes and senses of place.  Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3460 6.00.  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3081 3.00.

Environmental Arts and Media: Skills, Methods, and  Action (EU ENVS 3100 3.00)

This course is designed to provide students with a more solid grounding in the creative, practical, political, and technical aspects of different genres of environmental arts, particularly in the improvement of applied writing skills more broadly for Environmental Studies.This course builds on understandings and skills in different modes of environmental arts and media introduced in EU/ENVS 1800 6.00 and EU/ENVS 2000 6.00.   Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.Prior to FALL 2020: EU/ENVS 3100 3.00 builds on ES/ENVS 1800 6.00 and ES/ENVS 2000 6.00

Environmental History (EU ENVS 3120 3.00)

Examines the culture-environment relationship in historical perspective. The focus is on ways in which social change is triggered by environmental change and vice-versa. Case studies illustrate general patterns of change, such as those associated with the introduction of alien species, new modes of agricultural production. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Community and Environmental Arts Workshop (EU ENVS 3122 3.00)

Students develop conceptual and practical skills for the production, presentation and evaluation of a community-based project in environmental visual art, media, writing and/or performance for social change. Working with a practicing visual artist, writer or director students create, produce, present and critically evaluate examples of environmental socially engaged art, literature, media or performance and are prepared for advanced work with diverse equality seeking communities. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.PRIOR TO WINTER 2017: course credit exclusion: FA/FACS 3122 3.00.

Popular Education for Environmental and Social Justice (EU ENVS 3125 3.00)

Students explore the key notions of popular education related to knowledge and power, and various forms of anti-oppression practice addressing racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, ableism, and human/non-human domination in the context of organizations and movements for social and environmental justice in a globalizing and diasporic context.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Energy and the Environment in Canada (EU ENVS 3130 3.00)

The course focuses on relation-ships between socio-economic development, energy use, and the environment in Canada. Energy sources, energy end use, energy technology, and energy institutions as well as the social and ecological impacts of energy use are examined. Energy systems supportive of sustainable development are explored.  Prerequisite: EU/ENVS 2400 6.00 or permission of Instructor.Prior to FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 2400 6.00

The Global Economy (EU GEOG 3130 3.00)

Examines the evolution of the world economy as well as the major institutions that have supported it, and interprets the new geography of investment, production and consumption that accompanies it.

Environmental and Sustainability Education (EU ENVS 3140 3.00)

Explores concepts and practices in environmental education in the widest sense, comprising formal, informal and aboriginal education ideas. The course takes a critical and historical and cultural approach to environmental education with an emphasis on developing and practising sustainable perspectives on how people learn about, think about and remember the natural environment. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Retailing, Shopping, Society and Space (EU GEOG 3140 3.00)

This course provides an overview of consumer shopping behaviour, the structure and process of retail location, and various social and economic issues associated with the contemporary retail economy. The geographical perspective is emphasized. Prerequisites: 54 credits passed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 3100 3.00.Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits passed, including AK/GEOG 2500 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: AK/GEOG 3100 3.00, AK/GEOG 3100A 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2005-2006), AS/GEOG 3140 3.00.

Human Animal Studies (EU ENVS 3150 3.00)

This course dwells within the emergent field of animal studies, and will consider a diverse range of human relationship to other animals. The foundation of the course is a contemporary, post-Cartesian vision of animals, with an emphasis on the relational knowledge that is made about, and between humans and other animals from a cultural and environmental studies perspective. The course enables students to develop a creative and rigorous engagement with some of the complex dimensions of such issues as: the historical and philosophical scope of animal studies; animal agency, sociality and consciousness; animal representations in literature, the arts and popular culture; animal advocacy, social movements and humane education; and animal questions in science and technology.  Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.Previously Titled: Human/Non-Human Animal Relations.

Technological Worlds: Geographies of Digital Capitalism (EU GEOG 3150 3.00)

The course examines the societal and geographical implications of new technologies, including digitalization, big data, artificial intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things. Students address  the economic and financial geographies of technological innovation and analyze techno-economic trends emerging from: the growth of personal data; the deployment of machine learning and AI; and the expansion of surveillance / platform capitalism.  Format: blended/online (if blended, then students should expect to spend 2 hours online and 1 hour in class)

Advocacy (EU ENVS 3151 3.00)

Introduces students to a range of approaches and issues in environmental politics and advocacy. Themes include: political dimensions of contemporary environmental problems; main currents in environmental political thought; and relations between governmental and non-governmental organizations in environmental advocacy. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Race/Racism and Environmental Justice (EU ENVS 3160 3.00)

Examines the intersection of "race"/racism and environmentalism. It begins from the premise that environmental issues are always already racialized. Issues as diverse as toxic facility siting, environmental assessment practices, ecological philosophies, and popular nature representations (re)produce powerful assumptions that turn on racist/ racialized constructs. Discussion may include: the history and current practices of environmental justice movements; questions of race and representation in green politics; the significance of environmentalism's silence about race; cross-cultural and anti-racist environmental politics; and postcolonial perspectives on global environmental issues.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Indigenous Environmental Thought (EU ENVS 3170 3.00)

Explores various Traditional Aboriginal processes of "coming to know" the environment. Students will be guided through an examination of these Aboriginal relationships, as they existed traditionally, through times of critical change, and into the present. The underlying theme of this course will focus on individual, regional, and national ways of "being and becoming" environmentally responsible moving outwards towards a Global responsibility.  Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Terrestrial Ecosystems (EU GEOG 3200 3.00)

An examination of the structure and function of vegetation and soil systems. The course focuses on such topics as the adjustment of ecosystems to human modification and the role of biogeography in conservation and resource management. Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00.

Advanced Urban Geography (EU GEOG 3220 3.00)

This course addresses significant contemporary urban issues that frame geographic understandings of metropolitan change in the twenty-first century.  Attention is directed towards understanding how cities are produced, consumed, and theorized as complex social, economic, ecological, and political systems.  Through lectures, discussion, and assignments students are encouraged to challenge geographical interpretations of the urban world, and to think critically about cities as products of capital investment, as collective public goods, and as socio-cultural spaces.  Prerequisites: 54 credits including AP/GEOG 2220 6.00.  Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 3220 6.00.  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits including AS/GEOG 3120 6.00.  Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 4180 6.00.

Advanced Urban Geography (EU GEOG 3220 6.00)

This course addresses significant contemporary urban issues that frame geographic understandings of metropolitan change in the twenty-first century.  Attention is directed towards understanding how cities are produced, consumed, and theorized as complex social, economic, ecological, and political systems.  Through lectures, discussion, and assignments students are encouraged to challenge geographical interpretations of the urban world, and to think critically about cities as products of capital investment, as collective public goods, and as socio-cultural spaces.  Prerequisites: 54 credits including AP/GEOG 2220 6.00.  Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 3220 3.00.  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits including AS/GEOG 3120 6.00.  Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 4180 6.00.

Environmental Politics and Urban and Regional Infrastructures: A Critical Introduction (EU ENVS 3222 3.00)

An introduction into urban and regional infrastructures. The course examines the history of and current issues surrounding hard (water, transportation, etc.) and soft (social) infrastructures in processes of (sub)urbanization from an urban political ecology perspective.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.NOTE: ENVS 3222 3.00 will have a field experience component; students will be visiting a city  within Canada.  There is additional cost associate with course to cover the trip.

Regional Governance (EU ENVS 3225 3.00)

Regional governance includes the government and civic organization of all aspects of life in an (urban) region. This course introduces concepts of the region, regionalism, regional government, and regional economic development. While the course has an international perspective, there will be a strong focus on historical and current regional governance in the Toronto urban region. Particular attention will be paid to issues related to environmental governance, bioregional issues and watershed planning and management. This course builds on EU/ENVS 2200 6.00 which is recommended.  Prior to FALL 2020: EU/ENVS 3225 3.00 builds on ES/ENVS 2200 6.00 Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Sustainable Urbanism: Environmental Planning and Design (EU ENVS 3226 3.00)

Planning and design of sustainable human environments is explored in this course. Consideration of the ecological, social and economic impacts of past and present and alternative future settlement patterns and processes provides the context for discussion. The focus of study is the GTA, although international examples will be used.  This course builds on EU/ENVS 2200 6.00 which is recommended. Prior to FALL 2020: EU/ENVS 3226 3.00 builds on ES/ENVS 2200.6.00 Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Urban Planning and Politics in Global Context (EU ENVS 3227 3.00)

Examines urban planning practice. It examines the origins and evolution of urban planning taking into account political, social, economic, and cultural circumstances by examining case studies from the phenomenon of planetary urbanization. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Restoration Ecology (EU ENVS 3230 3.00)

Explores the theoretical, biophysical and applied dimensions of restoration ecology. The course examines the circumstances surrounding policy, design and planning, and implementation of ecological restoration. It investigates many approaches (techniques and methods) enhancing the ecological integrity of degraded sites. The regional focus of the course is the Greater Toronto bioregion though lessons and experiences will relate to broader issues of ecological restoration. This course has extensive off campus field trips. Additional fees required.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Environmental Perception and Natural Disasters (EU GEOG 3250 3.00)

This course assesses the way people perceive their environment. Initially the course considers the theory of environmental perception. Considerable emphasis is placed on appraisal of natural and technological hazards and cultural perception. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3250 3.00.

Space/Place (EU GEOG 3300 3.00)

This course explores the construction, reproduction and representation of space, place and scale. Students are introduced to important socio-spatial theories that have affected how geographers understand such key concepts, including feminism, Marxism and postmodernism.  Prerequisites: 54 credits passed. Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits passed.  Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3300 3.00.

Politics, Performance and the Art of Resistance: Literature and Art in Postcolonial and Transnational Environments. (EU ENVS 3303 3.00)

Introduces students to the ways that performers, artists, writers and activists have imagined drama, art and literature as forms of political engagement with the global environment in a variety of settings and historical moments. Through readings, improvisations and other exercises students evaluate the possibilities and limitations of art and performance in affecting social, political and environmental domination and resistance. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Tropical Conservation and Sustainable Development (EU ENVS 3310 3.00)

A study of the theory and practice of conservation as applied to sustainable development in tropical environments. Emphasis on the integration of ecological, cultural and institutional dimensions in conservation practice for sustainability.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Global Environmental Politics (EU ENVS 3340 3.00)

Examines the interrelationship between globalization and environment. It analyzes the historical development of the global environmental system and theoretical approaches to understanding the global environment. It considers the main actors, institutions and legal instruments related to global environmental issues. The environmental impacts of, and political responses to, such phenomena as global warming, trade, structural adjustment, transnational corporate activity, foreign aid, environmental security, and biodiversity depletion are studied. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Geoinformatics: GIS I (EU GEOG 3340 3.00)

An introduction to the application of GIS to geographical/environmental problems. A broad conceptual overview of GIS approaches and their strengths and limitations. Students gain hands-on experience in the use of raster-based GIS technology with particular reference to resource management and planning topics. Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 2420 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2420 3.00. Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 3180 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), SC/GEOG 3180 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), ES/ENVS 3520 3.00.

Morphogenesis of Soils (EU GEOG 3360 3.00)

This course is concerned with the systematic study of climate, vegetation, parent material, topography and time on the development, classification and chemistry of soils. A field trip and laboratory work will form part of this course.

International Development: Critical Geographical Perspectives (EU GEOG 3370 3.00)

This course deals with conceptual debates on 'Third World' development. It also explores issues of development including economic growth and poverty, resource use, agrarian change, industrial transformation, service-sector development, rural urban inequality, gender relations, neoliberalism and imperialism, and prospects for democracy and macro-level structural social change in the less developed world.Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed or written permission of the Instructor.Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 4370 3.00.

Introduction to Climate Change Science and Policy (EU ENVS 3400 3.00)

This course is intended to provide a critical overview of the field with particular attention paid to emerging trends in science and planning systems. Description of the theoretical underpinnings of planning, the application and development of Decision Support Systems, as well as the introduction of case studies, will provide students with the background needed to deal with the particularities of regional planning issues of climate change adaptation(CCA). This course builds on EU/ENVS 1500 6.00 and EU/ENVS 2420 3.00 or EU/ENVS 3402 3.00Prior to FALL 2020:  ES/ENVS 1500 6.00 and ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3402 3.00 Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Geographies of Genders and Sexualities (EU GEOG 3400 3.00)

This course considers the construction, reproduction, and representation of gender and sexual identities as they intersect with other social differences in space. It introduces students to feminist and queer theorists and geographical scholarship on cis-gender, transgender, and sexualities in order to understand how power dynamics and norms cross-cut and shape social relations through space and across spatial scales.

The Science of Pollution: Impacts on the Environment and Human Health (EU ENVS 3401 3.00)

Introduces students to the major scientific concepts and principles that govern the origin, fate and effect of pollutants in the environment. Topics include fossil fuel and alternative energy sources, atmospheric pollution, heavy metal and pesticide toxicology, organic sewage, and endocrine disrupters. Further objectives of this course are to develop students' ability to analyze, manipulate, present and interpret scientific data and to develop the student's ability to review and critique scientific reports on scientific problems. Prerequisite: EU/ENVS 1500 6.00 or EU/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/BIOL 1000 3.00 and SC/BIOL 1001 3.00. Prior to FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 1500 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1400 6.00Course Credit Exclusions: ES/ENVS 2410 3.00 The Science of Pollution

Ecology and Conservation science (EU ENVS 3402 3.00)

The purpose of the course is to present the main scientific concepts and principles of ecology and conservation science that are applicable to environmental problems frequently encountered in Environmental Studies.  Topics include diagnosing species declines, conservation genetics, ecology of invasive species, habitat fragmentation, and ecotourism.  The more specific objectives of this course are to: give critical reflection on how these concepts are used; develop student's ability to analyze, manipulate, present and interpret scientific data; and develop student's ability to review and critique scientific reports on scientific problems. Prerequistie: EU/ENVS 1500 6.00 or EU/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/BIOL 1000 3.00 and SC/BIOL 1001 3.00. Prior to FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 1500 6.00 or AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 Course Credit Exclusions: ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 Ecology and Conservation Science

Environmental Policy I (EU ENVS 3410 3.00)

The formulation of environmental policy is the focus its underlying scope, concepts, legal bases, methodologies. Case studies illustrate the interaction of environmental policy with other policy areas: foreign and trade policy, economic and social policy. Critical review of how policy is created participants, effects, burdens and benefits. Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Environmental Law (EU ENVS 3420 3.00)

Introduction to basic legal concepts: sources of law, legal remedies, common law, administrative law. Planning acts, environmental protection acts and environmental assessment acts. Litigation processes, hearing boards, and their operation. Critical review of environmental legal concepts and their social, economic and environmental effects. Prerequisites:  EU/ENVS 2400 6.00, or by permission of the Instructor. Prior to FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 2400 6.00,

Environmental Assessment (EU ENVS 3430 3.00)

Provides a critical overview of the theory and practice of environmental assessment (EA). Course objectives include gaining familiarity with the fundamentals of EA; exploring substantive and process-oriented issues through case studies; and practising methods and techniques. EA is examined broadly as a management and decision-support tool with applications at the project, planning and policy levels.Prerequisite: Third- year or fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.

Resource Management (EU ENVS 3440 3.00)

Current theories of resource management, methods, information and decision-making are reviewed critically. Ethical, cultural, social and economic perspectives on resource management are explored through case studies. Prerequisite: Third- year or fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.

Geoinformatics: Remote Sensing I (EU GEOG 3440 3.00)

Introduction to the methods in which remote sensing data are collected, processed and analyzed. An emphasis is placed on environmental applications. The synergy between the technologies of remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) is also stressed.Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 2420 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2010 6.00 and one 2000-level environmental studies theme foundation course; or written permission of the Instructor. Course credit exclusions: ES/ENVS 3521 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013). Previously offered as: AP/GEOG 3440 3.00, SC/GEOG 3440 3.00.

Environment and Health: Social and Political Dimensions (EU ENVS 3450 3.00)

The overall purpose of this course is to develop a broader and critical framework that can be used to understand how human health is influenced by the larger cultural, ecological and political-economic forces at work in contemporary society. Topics include: socio-political aspects of toxicological risk management, environmental epidemiology, the precautionary principle, and social movements and environmental health. Prerequisite: Third- year or fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.

Making Canada (EU GEOG 3490 3.00)

This course investigates the historical transformations of Canada's geography prior to the 20th century, including settlement by indigenous peoples, resettlement by colonizing and immigrant populations, the expansion of the nation-state's territory, land clearance, resource extraction and related geographies of the labour force, the creation of national parks, and urbanization.   Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 3490 6.00.

Business and Sustainability: Issues and Strategies (EU ENVS 3505 3.00)

An introduction to key dimensions of business and sustainability including: what is sustainability?; "values-driven" business models and practices; eco-production in key economic sectors (food, manufacturing, energy, building); financing sustainability; indicators of sustainability; green regulation; and green business strategies. Prerequisite: Third- year or fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.

Biogeography (EU GEOG 3500 3.00)

An analysis of the geography of plants and animals emphasizing processes that operate at the population level, the origin and diversity of plants and animals, geographic patterns of diversity, and dynamics of species populations from local to continental scales. Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00.

Environmental Economics (EU ENVS 3510 3.00)

The application of economic principles to environmental issues is introduced and critically reviewed. Linkages between economic factors, social processes and natural environments are explored. The use of economic principles in deriving solutions to issues of pollution control, resource depletion, and environmental regulation is explored. Prerequisite: Third- year or fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor.

Methods of Sediment (EU GEOG 3510 3.00)

An examination of methods of laboratory analysis of soils and sediments including soil/sediment sampling, particle size, water and organic component analyses, microscopic analysis and data interpretation. Special emphasis is placed on methods of analysis in soil/sediment research.

Designing and Conducting Research in Geography (EU GEOG 3520 3.00)

Examines how geographers design and carry out research, and the different philosophical bases for creating geographical knowledge. A range of approaches will be covered, including research in qualitative human geography, quantitative human geography, and physical geography. PRIOR TO FALL 2014: Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 3740 3.00.

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems in Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 3520 3.00)

Provides students with an introduction to the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as they are commonly used to address contemporary environmental issues. Various applications, techniques and theoretical frameworks are presented to provide a critical appreciation of this geo-spatial technology. Students gain hands-on experience using industry standard software products and associated technologies (ie. Global positioning systems) to increase their ability to apply these computer-based methods of geographic inquiry. A wide range of case studies, research projects and laboratory assignments are used to demonstrate the principles of the growing area of study. Previously Titled: Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Environmental Studies.

Geoinformatics: Remote Sensing I (EU ENVS 3521 3.00)

This course represents an introduction to the methods in which remote sensing data are collected, processed and analyzed. An emphasis is placed on environmental applications. The synergy between the technologies of remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) is also stressed. Two lecture hours, two laboratory hours. One term. Prerequisites: EU//SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 or EU/ENVS 2009 3.00 and one 2000-level environmental studies theme foundation course; or written permission by the course director. Course credit exclusions: EU/SC GEOG 3440 3.00PRIOR TO FALL 2020: Prerequisites: AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2009 3.00 and one 2000-level environmental studies theme foundation course; or written permission by the course director.  Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3440 3.00 or AP/GEOG 3440 3.00

Field Studies in Physical Geography (EU GEOG 3540 3.00)

This course begins with lectures on field research methodology. The second phase concentrates on defining a field problem, leading to data collection in the field. The final part of the course deals with data analysis, and reviews methodological implications. Includes lectures, seminars and workshops, and a three to four day field trip.Prerequisites: Students must be registered as Honours majors in Geography or Environmental Science and must have successfully completed AP/GEOG 2420 3.00 and one of AP/GEOG 2400 6.00, AP/GEOG 2500 3.00 or AP/GEOG 2600 3.00; or permission of the Instructor. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 3330 3.00, AP/GEOG 4540 3.00 (prior to Fall 2012), SC/GEOG 4540 3.00 (prior to Fall 2012).

Conservation in the GTA: Nature, People, & Politics (EU GEOG 3590 3.00)

"This course investigates conservation issues in Canada from a political ecology perspective, charting the history of the conservation movement along with some of the most pressing contemporary conservation issues unfolding within Canada including the social, economic, and political geographical processes and contexts from which they have emerged. We will ground our study of these issues by examining a number of conservation-related controversies and projects unfolding in the GTA. This will enable us to better understand how Canadian conservation issues play out within our own communities, both historically and today, how local conservation issues reflect national and global geographical processes, and the innovative ways local groups are working to address these issues.Prerequisites: Geog. 1000 or Geog. 1410 and 54 credits successfully completed or written permission of the instructor.

Nations and Nationalisms (EU GEOG 3600 3.00)

This course examines theories, geographies and histories of nations, nationalisms and nation-states.  Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3600 3.00.

WiredCities: Community, Technology and Changing Urban Places (EU GEOG 3650 6.00)

"Examines the impact of technology on urban form, urban function and community. Emphasis is placed on the social, economic and political parameters of urban infrastructure, community formation, and everyday life in the wake of technological change.

Disaster! The Earth's Extreme Natural Events (EU GEOG 3700 3.00)

Geographical perspectives on the physical processes behind extreme natural events (volcanoes, tsunami, tornadoes, hurricanes) and their impact on people. Many case studies and the literature will be used to understand how physical geography impacts human activities and settlements. Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 2600 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2600 3.00.

Landscape Ecology (EU ENVS 3710 3.00)

Examines the interactions between ecological processes and spatial patterns. It reviews the basic principles of ecology and ecological interactions. It emphasizes applied and theoretical approaches to study landscape ecology patterns and dynamics of ecosystems, and ecological processes, and the implications for degraded environments.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Society, Space and Environment in South Asia (EU GEOG 3710 3.00)

This course deals with the historical-geographical specificities of South Asia that are products of its own internal economic-political evolution and physical environmental context as well as of its historical and contemporary linkages to other parts of the world.Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including at least one of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including at least one of AS/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AS/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3710 3.00.

Urban Ecology (EU ENVS 3740 3.00)

Examines the challenges and potentials of incorporating ecological factors in urban systems. Lectures, field trips, readings and discussion provide the framework for the understanding of natural processes and cultural patterns and practices in the urban landscape. Functional and structural contexts are examined in relationship to the dynamics of natural urban ecosystems. Different urban environments and design projects provide a framework of systemic inquiry, criticism and interpretation.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Africa: The Impoverishment of a Continent (EU GEOG 3750 3.00)

This course critically examines the changing geography and depletion of Africa's resources from the precolonial to the present, with an emphasis on current events. The course covers a range of topics, including agriculture, natural resource extraction, migration, the slave trade, and AIDS.  Course credit exclusions: None.  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3750 3.00.

Plant Ecology (EU ENVS 3760 3.00)

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of native plants through their particular relationships to plant communities, physiological characteristics, environmental conditions and patterns. Basic concepts of plant ecology are reviewed prior to intensive field visits emphasizes plant identification, dynamics and distribution in various natural and/or urban ecosystems and plant communities. This course has extensive off campus field trips. Additional fees required.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

The Philippines: Geographical Perspectives on Global Integration (EU GEOG 3760 3.00)

Examines the processes through which the Philippines was, and is, incorporated into the global system. Topics will include precolonial trade and religious networks; colonial integration into Spanish and American empires; modern integration through Developmental institutions, and manufacturing and resource commodity chains. Filipino migrations will be given careful consideration, especially those that link the Philippines and Canada.

Housing Policy and Income Security Policy (EU GEOG 3770 3.00)

The course analyses Canadian and Ontario housing policy from 1945 to the present. Particular attention is given to policies dealing with housing affordability, homelessness, and home ownership. The analysis of housing policy is situated in the wider context of the evolution of the welfare state in Canada, emphasizing income security programs such as social assistance, unemployment insurance, pensions, and family benefits.Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or permission of the course instructor. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including one of AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AK/GEOG 2500 6.00 or AS/SOSC 2710 9.00 or permission of the course instructor. Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3770 3.00.

Citizen Science (EU ENVS 3800A 3.00)

The course provides students with an exploration of citizen science approaches and tools for various aspects of environmental justice, planning policy creation and environmental management while highlighting how the use of authoritative approaches have been influencing policy decisions. The course critically explores missed opportunities due to a lack of local participation, indigenous voices and volunteer scientists along with the criticisms related to the potential for uncertainty in the citizen science-based data. The value of local contributions towards public health solutions, climate change, environmental monitoring and advocacy, urban and regional policy creation are discussed. The course also explores technological solutions along with the fundamental principles of citizen science. The lectures explore theories and frameworks including origin, principles, criticism, threats and opportunities, while the labs engage students in existing citizen science projects and teach them how to create new projects using a mobile development kit without needing to write any code.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Urban Gardening and Sustainability (EU ENVS 3800D 3.00)

Students will have the chance to set up their own plot in a communal garden and reflect on growing and harvesting food through the lenses of food security, bio diversity, community engagement and sustainability.  Students will learn the theory and practice of urban gardening through a mixture of lectures, group projects and hands-on work in Maloca's garden on Keele Campus.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Geographies of Work (EU GEOG 3800 3.00)

Examines the geographies of productive and reproductive labour at multiple scales, including global, national, regional, urban, domestic and personal.

The Nature of Cities: The History of Urban Environments in North America (EU ENVS 3891 3.00)

Urbanization is the predominant form of human settlement in Canada and the United States. Over the course of the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries, a majority of North Americans came to live in ever more populous cities. This course will examine the environmental consequences of urban development in North America from the end of the eighteenth-century to the twenty-first century.Prerequisite: Third-year or fourth- year standing or by permission of the instructor.Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 3040 3.00.

Directed Reading (EU ENVS 3900 3.00)

Directed reading and directed study courses are intended for enrolment by students whose first major is Environmental Studies and who wish to pursue an intensive individual work with a particular Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change faculty member on a specific topic of study. Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements.

Directed Reading (EU ENVS 3900 6.00)

Directed reading and directed study courses are intended for enrolment by students whose first major is Environmental Studies and who wish to pursue an intensive individual work with a particular Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change faculty member on a specific topic of study.   Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements.  Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Physical Geography of the City (EU GEOG 3900 3.00)

This course explores the natural and physical systems of the city, focusing on the climate, water, geomorphology, biogeography of the urban landscape, including its built environment.  Course credit exclusions: None.  PRIOR TO FALL 2000: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3900 3.00.

Senior Honours Work Seminar (EU ENVS 4000 6.00)

Students work directly with a faculty member in the Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change to develop a collaborative project around select themes led by a faculty member's research interests. Students will develop a proposal with a faculty member matched to their program interests. Research includes multiple approaches and outcomes within two broad categories: 1) Major Paper (research paper, synthesis paper, literature review, content analysis, literary work, etc.). 2) Major Project (workshops, cultural productions, studio, field project etc.). Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete EU/ENVS 3010 3.00; or EU/ENVS 2009 3.00; attended a spring workshop for SHW; and have a B+ (7.00) cumulative GPA at the end of their third-year; or permission of the Undergraduate Program Director.Prior to FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3010 3.00; or ES/ENVS 2009 3.00

Honours Thesis (EU GEOG 4000 6.00)

An independent piece of research done under the supervision of a faculty adviser. The thesis must be submitted before the end of classes in the winter term; an exact date is established each year. There is an oral examination on the Honours thesis. One lecture hour per week at the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: 84 credits passed.

Placement Course (EU ENVS 4001 3.00)

The Placement course is an experiential education program designed to provide Honours Bachelor of Environmental Studies (BES) students with the opportunity to apply their classroom learning in a workplace environment. Through these placement opportunities, students will gain confidence in field-related knowledge, general employability skills, and valuable work experience. . Students must fulfill pre-course requirements in order to enrol in the course. Enrolment will be by permission of the Instructor and students will be graded on a pass/fail.Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements. Prerequisites: Third-year Honours ENST major one and completion of 60-90 credits with a cumulative GPA of 6.0 or better.

Placement Course (EU ENVS 4001 6.00)

The Placement course is an experiential education program designed to provide Honours Bachelor of Environmental Studies (BES) students with the opportunity to apply their classroom learning in a workplace environment. Through these placement opportunities, students will gain confidence in field-related knowledge, general employability skills, and valuable work experience. Students must fulfill pre-course requirements in order to enroll in the course. Enrolment will be by permission of the Instructor and students will be graded on a pass/fail. Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements. Prerequisites: Third-year Honours ENST major one and completion of 60-90 credits with a cumulative GPA of 6.0 or better.

Professional development the environmental sector: Preparation for experiential work placement. (EU ENVS 4002 3.00)

Students will develop job search strategies, cover letter writing and resume development skills, effective communication skills for interviewing and developing a professional image. This course provides preparation for students who want to enrol in the Experiential Work for Credit Placement course (EU/ENVS 4001), thus a primary goal of EU/ENVS 4002 is to secure a placement. This course is for-credit and is graded on the pass/fail grading scheme. Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration or Faculty requirements. Prerequisite: Students must complete 60 credits including all core 1000- and 2000-level courses required for the relevant Honours stream to enroll in the course. Enrolment is by permission of the Undergraduate Program Director and/or by the Instructor.

Inter-disciplinary Capstone Project (C4) (EU ENVS 4003 6.00)

The Interdisciplinary Capstone Project course (also known as C4: Cross-Campus Capstone Classroom) brings together upper-year undergraduate and Master level students from faculties across the university to work together in multi-disciplinary teams on pressing, "real-world" challenges, which are posed by organizations operating in both the for-profit and not-for-profit worlds. They research, design, test and reflect on potential solutions to their challenge that build on their existing skills and knowledge within their disciplines.Pre-requisite:  Completion of 60- 90 credits and in student's final year of study for either the Bachelor's or Honours degree.

Food, Land and Culture (EU ENVS 4011 3.00)

Examines food, land, and culture from a critical interdisciplinary environmental perspective. Students have the opportunity to pursue their own interests related to food politics, planning, sustainable and alternative agriculture, human-animal relationships and ethics, from a local and or global perspective. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Urban Historical Geography (EU GEOG 4040 6.00)

Examines the historical geography of cities, particularly those of 19th century North America. The major focus of attention is the role of certain economic and cultural factors in the development of spatial arrangements within and among cities. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed and one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, AP/HIST 2600 6.00.

Alternative Economic Firms and Arrangements (EU ENVS 4041 6.00)

This course investigates alternatives to capitalist corporations that are characterized by some degree of mutuality, such as co-operatives and worker-owned firms. Key issues examined include the competitiveness of alternatives and their desirability on other grounds, including contributions to local economic development.Prerequisite: Fourth year standing or by permission of the instructor.  Students with Third year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/SOSC 4041 6.00.

Nature, Neoliberalism and Political Ecology (EU GEOG 4050 3.00)

This seminar explores complementary scholarship on 'first world' political ecology and the commodification of nature in order to critically explore issues of environmental management and resource conflict. It will draw on case studies about rural and urban North American environments. Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed including AP/GEOG 3050 3.00 or permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed including AS/GEOG 3050 3.00 or permission of the course director. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4050 3.00.

Women in North America: Historical Geographies of Gender and Sexuality (EU GEOG 4060 3.00)

This course explores the changing geographies of women in Canada and the United States over the past three centuries, focusing on the historical and spatial construction of gender. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions:  AS/GEOG 4060 3.00, AS/HIST 4050E 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004) and AS/HIST 4081 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2005-2006).

Urban Identities: Historical Perspectives on Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Class in Canadian and American Cities (EU GEOG 4090 3.00)

"This course considers the historical and spatial construction of racial, ethnic, gender and class identities in the broader context of urban development in Canada and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries.Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed and one of: AP/GEOG 2220 6.00 or AP/GEOG 4040 6.00 or AP/GEOG 4170 3.00 or AP/WMST 3505 3.00 or GL/WMST 3505 3.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or AP/SOSC 3760 6.00 or AP/SOCI 3830 6.00 or AP/SOCI 4055 6.00 or AP/SOCI 4120 6.00, or written permission of the Instructor.

Aboriginal; Space and the City:  North American Urbanization and Aboriginal People, 1890-1980 (EU GEOG 4095 3.00)

"This course considers the historical construction of Aboriginal space in Canada and the US and its relationship to cities, from early colonization to the present. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4095 3.00.

Environmental Literatures (EU ENVS 4100 3.00)

Explores the role of literature and literary criticism (including ecocriticism) in interpreting, creating, and transforming environmental discourse and politics. It will take up questions concerning the historical development of environmental and nature writing, and will explore a variety of contemporary genres that call older traditions to account. Through the close reading of a diverse collection of literary texts (poetry, novels, short stories, plays, etc.), we will examine and practice a number of different approaches to defining, reading, and critiquing environmental literatures. This course builds on EU/ENVS 1800 6.00 which is recommended.Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty. Prior to FALL 2020: This course builds on ES/ENVS 1800 6.00 which is recommended.

Conservation Biology (EU ENVS 4110 3.00)

This course explores the role of biological science in efforts to conserve natural resources, systems and the organisms therein. Two lecture hours, three laboratory hours. One term. Three credits. Prerequisites: SC/BIOL 2010 4.00; one of SC/BIOL 2030 4.00, SC/BIOL 2031 3.00; SC/BIOL 2040 4.00; SC/BIOL 2050 4.00; or permission of the instructor.

Biodiversity (EU ENVS 4111 3.00)

We do not know the number of species on Earth, even to the nearest order of magnitude. This course discusses the factors that influence the number of species in an area and the importance of biodiversity to humanity. Note: Completion of 60 credits required, towards a degree in biology or environmental science or environmental studies, or permission of the Instructor.

Natural History: Political Ecology Encounters Environmental Education in Costa Rica (EU ENVS 4120 3.00)

Explores the beliefs, theories and practices of naturalists, through readings as well as visits to sites of natural history. It examines the ways in which current approaches to natural history are products of the historical development of the field, and reflect assumptions regarding scientific knowledge formation and practice. NOTE: This course will be offered as part of the Semester Abroad Programs in Costa Rica. Students are admitted through a selection process. Additional fees are required to cover the trip to Costa Rica. Final cost to be determined.Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Arts in Action: Pedagogy, Ethics and Praxis (EU ENVS 4122 3.00)

The seminar provides a space to explore opportunities and challenges that arise when working on art and media productions with community organizations, or when exploring approaches to arts for education and advocacy around environmental and social issues. Students in the Cultural and Artistic Practices certificate program (CAP) reflect on key ethical, pedagogical, and creative issues that emerge during their practicum while non-CAP students reflect on other community arts projects.Prerequisite: EU/ENVS 2122 3.00 or by permission of the instructor.   Prior to Fall 2020: ES/ENVS 2122 3.00 or by permission of the instructor.

Planning Suburbs (EU GEOG 4130 3.00)

From garden suburbs to post-war inner- and outer-suburbs, from New Urbanist communities to edge cities, technoburbs, and exurbs, this course critically considers the planning of suburban built form and the suburbanization process in historical perspective.  Consideration is given to the mechanisms and the challenges of managing suburban growth, and to the complex socio-cultural geographies and values that shape the suburbs and the suburban way of life.  Attention is directed to issues of gender, racialized poverty, unemployment, infrastructural inadequacy, sprawl, and sustainability, and an effort is made to envision alternative futures.   Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 4130 6.00.

Environmental Thought (EU ENVS 4140 3.00)

An introduction to diverse ways of seeing and understanding nature. An historical perspective on the development of environmental thought leads to an exploration of various perspectives and critiques of the standard scientific and technological approaches to understanding nature, as offered by alternative schools of thought such as humanists, deep ecologists and ecofeminists. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Foodscapes and Agri-scapes: Geographical Perspectives (EU GEOG 4150 3.00)

The course explores the landscapes and scales of food and agriculture. Questions include: Can we change ourselves and the world through what we eat? Why do we still have world hunger? Who really controls how food is produced and consumed? Emphasis is given to food and agricultural geographies in the global south. Prerequisites: 84 credits completed.

Social Movements, Activism and Social Change (EU ENVS 4161 3.00)

Examines new social movements that have arisen in response to the crisis of industrial culture, economic restructuring, shifting political formations, and ecological disasters. The course focuses on current theories of social movements, contested issues, and case studies of social movements in action and is intended to provide opportunities for students to gain first hand experience with social movement organizations through participatory research projects. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Geographic Perspectives on Immigration, Ethnicity and Race in Modern Cities (EU GEOG 4170 3.00)

This course first discusses a number of conceptual issues concerning the residential segregation of ethnic and racial groups. The course then considers several case examples that exemplify the varied experiences of ethnic and racial groups in modern cities.Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor. Third-year Honours students with 78 credits completed who are also taking summer courses may enrol.

Laboratory Analysis of Ecological Materials (EU GEOG 4180 3.00)

This course introduces students to a comprehensive range of laboratory techniques for the analysis of plant, soil and water samples. Laboratory sessions and projects provide students with experience in analytical procedures and the operation of major items of laboratory equipment. Four scheduled lecture/laboratory hours, three additional laboratory hours. One term. Prerequisite: Six credits in physical geography at the 3000 or 4000 level or ES/ENVS 2410 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or LE/EATS 1010 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00. Course credit exclusions: None.  PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisite: Six credits in physical geography at the 3000 or 4000 level or ES/ENVS 2410 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or SC/EATS 1010 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00. Course credit exclusions: None.  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: Six credits in physical geography at the 3000 or 4000 level or ES/ENVS 2410 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or SC/EATS 1010 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4180 3.00.

Geographies of the Ethnic Economy (EU GEOG 4190 3.00)

Examines how location helps, hinders, or shapes ethnic economies; how various socio-cultural, economic-politico, institutional, and transnational spaces shape ethnic economies; how ethnic economies and other geographically identifiable phenomenon, such as residential segregation or institutional distributions, are related; and how ethnic economies shape the urban landscape.Prerequisites: 84 credits completed; at least one of AP/GEOG 2100 6.00, AP/GEOG 2220 6.00, AP/GEOG 3140 3.00 or permission of Instructor.

Water Quality and Stream Ecosystems (EU GEOG 4200 3.00)

The course focuses on selected aspects of river water quality, including hillslope hydrology and the transport of pollutants, the impacts of human activities on water chemistry, nutrient transformations within stream ecosystems, and the effects of water quality on stream biological communities.Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, ES/ENVS 2410 3.00, or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00.

Climatology of High Latitudes (EU GEOG 4205 3.00)

A study of the processes of energy and moisture exchanges in polar regions with emphasis on the Canadian north. Topics include atmospheric and oceanic transport of energy, surface microclimate and the sensitivity of high latitude environments to climate change. Normally offered in alternate years.Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 2400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 2400 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Global Populations: Critical Environmental Perspectives (EU ENVS 4210 3.00)

Examines the trends, causes and consequences in population growth and movements across the globe. It studies the environmental impacts of rises in population, global refugee and immigration patterns and their socio-environmental consequences, and the influence of new immigrants and 'diasporas' on national identity and culture. Case studies explore existing and alternative family planning policies, the enhancement of women's status through educational, health and employment strategies, and immigration and multicultural policies in developed and developing countries. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Hydrometeorology (EU GEOG 4210 3.00)

A study of the relationship between the atmosphere and the hydrosphere with the emphasis on the process of evaporation. The course includes an in-depth review of evaporation models and the instrumentation necessary for data acquisition. Normally offered in alternate years.Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 2400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 2400 6.00.

Globalization and Indigenous Peoples (EU ENVS 4215 3.00)

Indigenous peoples are distinct communities who have experienced the processes of globalization in particular ways. This course reviews the global historical processes of imperialism and colonialism and their legacies of racism, assimilation and marginalization. The course then examines Indigenous peoples' resistance to globalization and engagement with global networks and institutions, in order to protect their cultures and assert their rights. NOTE; This course will be offered as part of the Semester Abroad Programs in Costa Rica. Students are admitted through a selection process. Additional fees are required to cover the trip to Costa Rica. Final cost to be determined.Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Ecological Climatology (EU GEOG 4215 3.00)

The field of Ecological Climatology provides an interdisciplinary framework for understanding how terrestrial ecosystems function in relation to climate systems. It examines the physical, chemical and biological processes by which landscapes affect and are affected by climate. The central theme is that ecosystems, through their cycling of energy, water, chemical elements and trace gases are important determinants of climate. The coupling between climate and vegetation is seen at spatial scales from the leaf to biomes and at timescales from seconds to millenia. Both natural vegetation dynamics and human induced land-use changes are mechanisms of climate change. The course combines a theoretical understanding of ecological climatology with applied experimentation to reinforce the principals involved. Prerequisite: AP/SC GEOG 2400 6.00; and either AP/GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00; and either AP/GEOG 2420 3.00 or SC GEOG 2420 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2060 3.00. Graduate student prerequisites: With permission of the Instructor.

Urbanization in Developing Countries (EU ENVS 4220 3.00)

The key issues of cities in the Third World are addressed, including squatter settlements, rural-urban migration, urban agriculture, housing, urban transport, basic services (water, sanitation, waste management, health and education), urban governance, socio-cultural diversity, and urban environmental planning. Case studies demonstrate public policies and their link to socio-economic, cultural and environmental issues. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Neoliberal Geographies (EU GEOG 4220 3.00)

This course examines neoliberalism as a geographical process - or 'neoliberalization' - through an examination of key transformations since the 1970s in the Global North and Global South. It focuses on the implications of neoliberalization for international, national, and regional political economies; political institutions, territories, and power dynamics; labour, work, and migration patterns and practices; and visions and discourses of societal progress.

Global Cities (EU ENVS 4223 3.00)

An introduction to the literature on global cities and a systematic review of a distinct field of research in urban studies which concerns itself with the globalization of a network of global or world cities.Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Urban Sustainability I (EU ENVS 4225 3.00)

A conceptual approach to defining "sustainability" for urban areas, considering patterns of land use, human activities, natural systems and needed rehabilitation. Concepts such as urban ecology, social ecology, the ecological footprint, etc. will be discussed. Social sustainability, environmental justice, and urban governance are central to the course design. Case studies explore ways of making urban areas more sustainable. Prerequisites: EU/ENVS 3225 3.00, or Fourth-year standing  or by permission of the Instructor.Prior to FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3225 3.00

Design for Sustainability in the Built Environment (EU ENVS 4230 3.00)

The course explores the principles and best practices in sustainable building design and sustainable development in an urban context. It takes an international perspective on the issues. The course format actively engages students to collaborate in small groups to complete  projects, and to tour landmark green building  projects.     NOTE: This course has extensive off campus field trips. Additional fees required. Integrated with the graduate course EU/ENVS 5070 3.0PRIOR TO FALL 2020: Integrated with the graduate course ES/ENVS 5070 3.0Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

The Planning of Urban Public Facilities (EU GEOG 4240 3.00)

Theoretical and practical problems concerning the supply and distribution of public goods and services in urban areas.Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None.Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AK/GEOG 2500 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AS/SOSC 2710 9.00 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4240 3.00.

Imagined Landscapes (EU GEOG 4250 3.00)

Examines the representation of landscapes in fictional literature, film, visual arts and music. Emphasis is placed on the power, purpose and problems of metaphor, symbolism and representation. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Applied Transportation Geography (EU GEOG 4260 3.00)

This course focuses on urban transportation planning and policy analysis as an area of research. It discusses the theoretical principles governing movement and planning, and analytically examines approaches to policy problems.Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 2100 6.00, AP/GEOG 2220 6.00.  Course credit exclusions: None.Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including one of AK/GEOG 3420 6.00, AK/GEOG 3430 6.00, AS/GEOG 2100 6.00, AS/GEOG 3120 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4260 3.00.

Imagining Toronto: Literary Geographies of a City (EU GEOG 4280 3.00)

This course explores intersections of literature and place in the Toronto region, exposing students to critical and imaginative works on place, culture, and representation. Close readings of a wide selection of Toronto-based literature are paired with critical scholarly works interrogating how places are invented, (re)presented, and (re)produced. Prerequisite: At least 84 credits successfully completed or permission of the instructor.  Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4280 3.00.

Directed Reading (EU GEOG 4290 3.00)

This course may be used for individualized study, in which case the student requires permission from a faculty member who agrees to supervise the program of directed reading and from the Chair of the department. Note: See the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies section of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar for Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies regulations on Independent Reading Courses.

Directed Reading (EU GEOG 4290 6.00)

This course may be used for individualized study, in which case the student requires permission from a faculty member who agrees to supervise the program of directed reading and from the Chair of the department. Note: See the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies section of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar for Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies regulations on Independent Reading Courses.

Extraction and its Discontents (EU ENVS 4310 3.00)

This course examines current political, economic and social debates concerning extractive industry, placing these in the context of longer histories of global imperialism and colonialism. Following a review of conceptual approaches to natural resource `extraction`, the course will examine contemporary global regulation and resistance to it, focusing upon the state, the corporation, the resource, the affected community, and the (global) social movement as units of analysis.Course Credit Exclusion: ES/ENVS 4310 3.0 Extraction and its Discontents: A Social History and Political EconomyPre-Requisite: Fourth year standing or by permission of the instructor.  Students with Third year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Dynamics of Snow and Ice (EU GEOG 4310 3.00)

Examines the formation, distribution, structure and degradation of snow, as well as lake, river and sea ice. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: AP//GEOG 2400 6.00 or SC/GEOG 2400 6.00.

Geoinformatics: GIS II (EU GEOG 4340 3.00)

Advanced course in geographic information systems (GIS), oriented around raster structures. Computer graphics for mapping introduced and work undertaken on finely divided surfaces. GIS considers both practical and theoretical questions of interpretation. Macintosh computers and raster-based software used for hands-on focus.Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 3340 3.00 or SC/GEOG 3340 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2013: Previously offered as: AP/GEOG 4340 3.00, SC/GEOG 4340 3.00.

Urban Social Policy (EU GEOG 4380 3.00)

A critical examination of the links between urban social problems and state policies. The course studies how policy makers, planners and geographers understand and deal with social problems in the contemporary city and evaluates selected planning policies. Integrated with: GS/GEOG 5370 3.00. Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, and at least six additional credits in human geography at the 2000- or 3000- level.

Asia-Pacific Development: Geographical Perspectives (EU GEOG 4395 3.00)

This course examines socio-economic development in the Asian-Pacific region from a Canadian prospective. In particular, the course focuses on geographical flows of migration, trade, investment and aid between Canada and Asia, and corresponding social, political and economic changes in Asian societies.  Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None.  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 3390K 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2002-2003), AS/GEOG 4390K 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004) and AS/GEOG 4395 3.00.

Fundamentals of Renewable Energy: Theory, Policy and Practice (EU ENVS 4400 3.00)

The course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of key renewable energy options for electricity generation, heating and cooling of buildings and transportation. Students will be introduced to a critical analysis of renewable energy as a strategy for climate change mitigation, community empowerment, industrial development, and energy security. This course builds on EU/ENVS 3130 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3130 3.00 Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Physical Hydrology and Water Resources (EU GEOG 4400 3.00)

An intermediate course in the physical principles of hydrological and water resource systems. Topics to be discussed include groundwater storage and flow, deterministic hydrological models and physical hydrological aspects of current water resource problems. Normally offered in alternate years. Two lecture hours, two laboratory hours. One term.  Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None.   PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4400 3.00.

Fundamentals of Energy Efficiency: Theory, Policy and Practice in a Canadian Context (EU ENVS 4401 3.00)

This course is designed to allow students to explore the policy and technical dimensions of energy efficiency and energy conservation in greater depth, with particular focus on potential contributions to sustainability of energy systems and climate change mitigation in a Canadian context. This course builds on EU/ENVS 3130 3.00.   PRIOR TO FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3130 3.00 Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Climate Change Mitigation (EU ENVS 4402 3.00)

This course expands on the concepts presented in EU/ENVS 3400 3.00 and examines in detail current and future options to reduce emissions at different government levels and prospects for multilateral and local collaborations. The course also critically analyzes the design, implementation and performance of domestic and international mitigation policy initiatives. Completion of either EU/ENV 3130 3.00 or EU/ENVS 3400 3.00 is strongly recommended. PRIOR TO FALL 2020:  ES/ENV 3130 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3400 3.00 is strongly recommended.Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Environmental Policy II (EU ENVS 4410 3.00)

Presents a "theory" of policy development, covering the roles of various groups such as the public, NGOs, the media and industry and applies the "theory" to the processes of international Conventions and Protocols. These include the Canada/US Boundary Waters Treaty, and the Canada/USA Air Quality Accord. Covers some of the mechanisms that use environmental science to establish Convention on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.Prerequisite: Fourth year standing or by permission of the instructor.  Students with Third year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Desert Ecosystems (EU GEOG 4410 3.00)

This course focuses on the vegetation of the desert, species adaptations to high temperature and aridity and the interactions between organisms, and between plants and their environment.Prerequisites: One of: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 6.00.

Environment, Media, Culture and Communication (EU ENVS 4420 3.00)

Media and communication technologies both shape and are shaped by cultural constructs, institutions and practices. This course will examine how the environment is framed and contested through dominant and alternative media, applying critical media, communication, and cultural studies theories (such as political economy, textual analysis, and audience reception). A variety of media forms will be explored (print and broadcast, photography and video, Web-based and digital media, spoken word and performance etc.) through active critique and creative cultural production. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Environmental Law & Justice: Stories and Struggles (EU ENVS 4421 3.00)

Examines and evaluates how contemporary advocates employ law to protect the environment, secure equal access to environmental health, and contribute to social justice. This course builds on EU/ENVS 3420 3.00, which is recommended. PRIOR TO FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3420 3.00 Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Impact Assessment Process & Practice (EU ENVS 4430 3.00)

The current processes and practices of environmental and social impact assessment are critically reviewed through case studies. Emerging conceptual and methodological issues in the field are explored in the context of actual practice situations.Prerequisites: EU/ENVS 3430 3.00, or fourth- year standing or permission of the Instructor.PRIOR TO FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3430 3.00

Environmental Disasters (EU ENVS 4440 3.00)

The overall objective of this course is to gain an understanding of the causes and responses to natural and technological disasters. An in-depth examination of various case studies of disasters will be used to illustrate the principles involved. Topics include the history of disaster research, emergency management, normal accidents, and the psychosocial impacts of disasters. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Geoinformatics: Remote Sensing II (EU GEOG 4440 3.00)

Sophisticated methods and techniques for collecting, processing and analyzing remote sensing data are examined. Special topics include image enhancement techniques (e.g. texture transforms), non-traditional image classification and data integration for incorporation of remote sensing data products into geographic information systems (GIS). Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 3440 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3521 3.00 or LE/EATS 4220 3.00 or written permission of the Instructor. Course credit exclusions: ES/ENVS 4521 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013). Previously offered as: AP/GEOG 4440 3.00, SC/GEOG 4440 3.00.

Environmental Auditing (EU ENVS 4442 3.00)

This course focuses on the principles, processes and techniques of environmental auditing and management systems (e.g. ISO 14001). A highlight of the course requires the students to conduct, in a team setting, an on-campus environmental audit, which includes a formal presentation of findings and a final audit report. Concepts of environmental monitoring, environmental risk assessment and occupational health and safety are also addressed through lectures, class discussions, demonstrations and assignments. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Ontario Environmental Politics and Policy (EU ENVS 4445 3.00)

Examines current and emerging environmental and conservation policy issues in Ontario. Examples of the issues to be examined may include: biodiversity and species at risk; land stewardship and agricultural land conservation; conventional vs. green energy; mining and natural resources development; municipal solid waste management; water quality and quantity; climate change; smog and air quality. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Protected Area Management (EU ENVS 4446 3.00)

Explores protected area management, which is a form of environmental management focusing on an area of land and/or freshwater/sea especially dedicated to the protection and maintenance of biological diversity, and of natural and associated cultural resources, and managed through legal or other effective means.NOTE: This course will be offered as part of the Semester Abroad Programs in Costa Rica. Students are admitted through a selection process. Additional fees are required to cover the trip to Costa Rica. Final cost to be determined.Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Northern Ecosystems: A Natural History of Arctic Regions (EU ENVS 4447 3.00)

Examines the interactions between species and their environment in northern terrestrial and marine habitats. We review the postglacial history, climate, and energy flow in boreal and arctic ecosystems and examine evolutionary adaptations to cold, highly-seasonal environments. We consider strategies for wildlife management and conservation and the threats posed by climate change, resource development, and pollution. Prerequisite: EU/ENVS 3402 3.00 or EU/ENVS 2420 3.00 or permission of the Instructor.PRIOR TO FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3402 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00

Ecological Economics (EU ENVS 4510 3.00)

An introduction to the emerging field of ecological economics. Areas of focus include the appropriate scale of the economy in relation to the environment, the role of discount rates in mediating intergenerational and interspecies equity, environmental valuation, full-cost accounting, environmental risk assessment, and the application of thermodynamic and ecological principles in economic analysis. Prerequisite: EU/ENVS 3510 3.00 or fourth- year standing  or permission of the Instructor.PRIOR TO FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3510 3.00

Geographical Information Systems Applications in Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 4520 3.00)

Focuses on advanced applications of Geographic Information Systems to topics related to planning and resource management. The technical aspects of GIS applications will be explored along with considerations related to database development. Students will gain hands-on experience with data input through scanners and digitizers, and with GIS analyses using both vector and raster data models. A significant part of the course will involve the development of a GIS database for analysis through group projects. Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 3520 3.00, or the permission of the instructor.

Research Design & Field Studies in Human Geography (EU GEOG 4520 3.00)

This course puts into practice what students have learned in AP/GEOG 3520 3.00: Designing and Conducting research in Human Geography. The course integrates on-campus preparation, data analysis and report writing with off-campus fieldwork during which data collection and preliminary analysis are carried out. The fieldwork relates to a geographic problem offering scope for the special interests of students in various aspects of Geography.Prerequisites: Students must be registered as Honours majors in Geography and must have successfully completed 54 credits, including AP/GEOG 1400 6.0 or SC/GEOG 1400 6.00; AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00; AP/GEOG 2420 3.00 or SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 and AP/GEOG 3520 3.00; or permission of the Instructor. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 3330 3.00; AP/GEOG 4540 3.00 (prior to Fall 2012 or, SC/GEOG 4540 3.00 (prior to Fall 2012).

Field Studies in Human Geography (EU GEOG 4521 6.00)

This course introduces students to geographic field studies by bringing traditional classroom learning into the field through a combination of pre-departure seminars and an extended trip to a location away from the University. Specific topics and locations vary as per the course director(s) expertise. During the fieldtrip students learn about geographical issues through observation, participation, discussions, and lectures, while reflecting critically on fieldwork. Prerequisites:  86 credits completed, including Geog 1000 or 1410, or written permission of Course Director

Geoinformatics: Remote Sensing II (EU ENVS 4521 3.00)

Sophisticated methods and techniques for collecting, processing and analyzing remote sensing data are examined. Special topics include image enhancement techniques (e.g. texture transforms), non-traditional image classification and data integration for incorporation of remote sensing data products into geographic information systems (GIS). One and one-half lecture hours, one and one-half laboratory hours. One term. Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 3440 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3521 3.00 or LE/EATS 4220 3.00 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: AP/SC/GEOG 4440 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), ES/ENVS 4521 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013).  PRIOR TO SUMMER 2013: Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 3440 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3521 3.00 or SC/EATS 4220 3.00 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: AP/SC/GEOG 4440 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013), ES/ENVS 4521 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013).  PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/GEOG 3440 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3521 3.00 or SC/EATS 4220 3.00 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4440 3.00.

Systems Thinking in Environmental Studies: Theory and Methodologies (EU ENVS 4523 3.00)

This course addresses fundamentals of general and complex systems thinking (such as general systems theory, complex adaptive systems, chaos theory) major paradigms in systems thinking (functionalist, interpretive, emancipatory, postmodern), and their associated methodologies and applications in environmental studies. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Advanced Field Studies in Physical Geography (EU GEOG 4541 3.00)

This course applies geographic principles and field techniques to problems in physical geography during a field trip of at least one weeks duration to a location normally outside of Ontario. Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00, AP/GEOG 2420 3.00, and students are encouraged to take AP/GEOG 3540 3.00 prior to taking this course. Priority will be given to Geography Honours and Environmental Science students having already completed 84 credits.

Rivers: Environment and Process (EU GEOG 4600 3.00)

Provides fundamental knowledge of river mechanics and related environmental conditions. It provides an integration of physical, environmental and spatial aspects of river behaviour. The course involves the application of principles of hydrology, geomorphology, sedimentology and fluid mechanics.

The Greater Toronto Area: A Geographical Perspective (EU GEOG 4605 3.00)

This course examines the processes and issues of urban growth and change in the Greater Toronto Area, including the forces shaping growth, the consequences of growth, and planning initiatives/proposals for managing growth. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed or permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4605 3.00.

Geopolitics (EU GEOG 4610 3.00)

Examines the geographic basis of the political evolution of the nation-state, from its emergence in Western Europe to its varied diffusions throughout the world. It explores notions of turf and territory, nationalism and the growth of geopolitical awareness. Prerequisites: At least 72 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00.

The Critical Geographies of Education (EU GEOG 4700 3.00)

This course explores the complex interactions between education, space and civil society. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of policy restructuring on the geographies of educational landscapes. Theoretical and empirical studies are used to explore, analyze and critically engage in current debates. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed including one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.0, AP/GEOG 1000 6.0 or written permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4700 3.00.

Geography of Disabilities (EU GEOG 4750 3.00)

This course explores the inter-relationships between disability, space and environment. It investigates the ways in which these have been treated in the social science literature, examines both individual and collective experiences, explores aspects of planning and design, especially in cities, and seeks paths towards an enabling geography.Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, and  72 credits successfully completed or permission of instructor. Course credit exclusions: None.PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  Prerequisites: AS/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1410 6.00, and 54 credits or permission of instructor. Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4750 3.00.

Political Ecology of Landscape (EU ENVS 4750 3.00)

This course is structured around a critical analysis of historical and theoretical issues related to natural and urban landscape. The emphasis of this course is on the development and transformation of landscapes as an expression of various social, cultural, physical, economic, political, artistic, technological, and ecological forces through space and time. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Advanced Topics in Environment and Health (EU ENVS 4800A 3.00)

This course focuses on topics related to environment and health. Possible focal topics are: community health; HIV & globalization; ecosystem health; systems approaches to health; infectious diseases and global cities; health and environmental disasters; health and environmental justice; or toxic tort and community health. It is strongly recommended that students take EU/ENVS 3450 3.00 Environment and Health: Social and Political Dimensions.  PRIOR TO FALL 2020: ES/ENVS 3540 3.00NOTE: This course will be offered as part of the Semester Abroad Programs in Costa Rica. Students are admitted through a selection process. Additional fees are required to cover the trip to Costa Rica. Final cost to be determined.Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Animal Worlds (EU ENVS 4800B 3.00)

This course dives deep into the worlds of animals, with a focus on where those worlds coalesce with human, built environments. Drawing from the emergent and innovative fields of multispecies studies, animal studies, animal geographies and ecological psychology, as well as the more established environmental studies, urban ecology, urban geography and environmental planning, this course will enable students to develop a critical and creative engagement with the complex issues and opportunities arising at the intersections of rapid, global urbanization and urban wildlife resilience. This course will cover topics about: animal agency: animal ethics: animal cognition; human-wildlife interactions; interspecies communication; ecological affordances; multispecies justice; urban planning and design; green architecture: novel ecologies; urban rewilding, trans-species urban theory, and urban wildlife policy and management.  Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor; Students with third- year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

The Black Atlantic and Environmental Justice (EU ENVS 4800E 3.00)

The course explores the formation of the Black Atlantic as a conceptual and geographic space through texts, music, performance and visual art.  Starting with the trade in humans and the middle passage, and ending with contemporary environmental questions, students explore the inventiveness set in motion by communities of the black diaspora as they struggle for racial and environmental justice through a diversity of strategies, across time and space. They investigate the ways in which these efforts have transformed the West and discuss the ways in which they continue to do so. This course builds on ENVS 3160, Race/Racism and Environmental Justice.Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor; Students with third- year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Urban Development Process (EU ENVS 4800Q 3.00)

Critical investigation of approaches to, and topics in, processes of urban growth, decline, development and redevelopment. 20th-century theories of urbanization are examined and their relevancy for understanding selected recent urban problems are studied. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

International Field Course: Conservation and Development for Social-Environmental Sustainability and Wellbeing in Costa Rica (EU ENVS 4810A 3.00)

Formally Titled: International Field Course:Ecology and Sustainability in Costa RicaAdvanced study, through thorough literature review and direct field observation, of the theory and principles of ecology as these apply to sustainable development in tropical environments, specifically in Costa Rica. Students Expectation in Costa Rica: 4-6 hours per day hiking in the rain forest, some days maybe longer hours, at times in steep and/or rough terrain, including, sometimes, slippery slopes covered in mud, while it is raining. Hiking boots along with some outdoor experience, or at least a degree of physical and psychological stamina, will be required. The reason for these relatively long walks is to observe natural ecosystems that have evolved away from urban areas. Note: This course is only open to students who are selected to participate in International Field work. Course credit exclusion: ES/ENVS 3810A 3.00.

International Field Course: Environmental Arts and Food Sovereignty in Costa Rica (EU ENVS 4810B 3.00)

This community-engaged workshop offers students the opportunity to experience environmental arts that are integral to struggles for food sovereignty and environmental justice in Costa Rica. It will be based out of the Las Nubes Eco-Campus in Costa Rica. Students will be introduced to a variety of local artists and growers. They will work collaboratively on creating and sharing environmental arts productions. Note: Semester Abroad: Enrolment is by permission of the Faculty.

The state, civil society and spaces of development (EU GEOG 4850 3.00)

This course deals with theoretical and empirical understandings of the ways in which the state and civil society organizations co-determine the geography of development.Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/GEOG 2100 3.00 or written permission of the Course Director.  Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including one of AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AS/GEOG 2100 3.00 or written permission of the Course Director.  Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4850 3.00.

Spaces of Conflict, Violence, and Power (EU GEOG 4880 3.00)

Examines the spatial aspects of conflict, violence, and power across various scales from the body to the transnational arena. Topics include territory and state violence, terrorism, forced migration, environmental conflict, and the spatial dimensions of resisting violence. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Public Space (EU GEOG 4900 3.00)

Examines the existence, genealogies, qualities, significance, and use of public space, as well as past and emergent challenges and threats to public space. Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Directed Study (EU ENVS 4900 3.00)

Directed reading and directed study courses are intended for enrolment by students whose first major is Environmental Studies and who wish to pursue an intensive individual work with a particular Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change faculty member on a specific topic of study.   Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Directed Study (EU ENVS 4900 6.00)

Directed reading and directed study courses are intended for enrolment by students whose first major is Environmental Studies and who wish to pursue an intensive individual work with a particular Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change faculty member on a specific topic of study.   Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Directed Study (EU ENVS 4900Z 3.00)

Directed reading and directed study courses are intended for enrolment by students whose first major is Environmental Studies and who wish to pursue an intensive individual work with a particular Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change faculty member on a specific topic of study.   Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Directed Study (EU ENVS 4900Z 6.00)

Directed reading and directed study courses are intended for enrolment by students whose first major is Environmental Studies and who wish to pursue an intensive individual work with a particular Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change faculty member on a specific topic of study.   Note: This course does not fulfill Area of Concentration requirements. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or by permission of the Instructor. Students with Third-year standing may have access subject to space availability and approval from the Faculty.

Courses for Graduate and Doctoral Studies

Food, Land, and Culture (EU ENVS 5011 3.00)

Examines food, land, and culture from a critical interdisciplinary environmental perspective. Students have the opportunity to pursue their own interests related to food politics, planning, sustainable and alternative agriculture, human-animal relationships and ethics, from a local and or global perspective.

Protected Area Management (EU ENVS 5016 3.00)

This course explores protected area management, which is a form of environmental management focusing on an area of land and/or freshwater/sea especially dedicated to the protection and maintenance of biological diversity, and of natural and associated cultural resources, and managed through legal or other effective means.

Urban Development Processes (EU ENVS 5021 3.00)

Critical investigation of approaches to, and topics in, processes of urban growth, decline, development, and redevelopment.  Twentieth century theories of urbanization are examined and their relevancy for understanding selected recent urban problems are studies.

Global Cities (EU ENVS 5023 3.00)

An introduction to the literature on global cities and a systematic review of a distinct field of research in urban studies which concerns itself with the globalization of a network of global or world cities. Course credit exclusion: GS/GEOG 5580 3.00.

Design for Sustainability in the Built Environment (EU ENVS 5030 3.00)

Explores the principles and best practices in sustainable building design and sustainable development in an urban context. It takes an international perspective on the issues. The interactive format actively engages students to collaborate in small groups to complete some projects, tour landmark green building projects, and to plan and participate in an interdisciplinary design charrette.

Fundamentals of Renewable Energy: Theory, Policy and Practice (EU ENVS 5050 3.00)

"Provides students with a critical understanding of key renewable energy options for electricity generation, heating and cooling of buildings and transportation. Students will be introduced to a critical analysis of renewable energy as a strategy for climate change mitigation, community empowerment, industrial development, and energy security.

Fundamentals in Energy Efficiency: Theory, Policy and Practice in the Canadian Context (EU ENVS 5051 3.00)

This course is designed to allow students to explore the policy and technical dimensions of energy efficiency and energy conservation in greater depth, with particular focus their potential contributions to the sustainability of energy systems and climate change mitigation in a Canadian context.

Environmental Law & Justice (EU ENVS 5061 3.00)

Examines and evaluates how contemporary advocates employ law to protect the environment, secure equal access to environmental health, and contribute to social justice.

Extraction and its Discontents: A Social History and Political Economy (EU ENVS 5070 3.00)

Examines current political, economic and social debates concerning extractive industry, placing these in the context of longer histories of global imperialism and colonialism. Following a review of conceptual approaches to natural resource `extraction`, the course will examine contemporary global regulation and resistance to it, focusing upon the state, the corporation, the resource, the affected community, and the (global) social movement as units of analysis.

New Social Movements, Activism and Social Change (EU ENVS 5073 3.00)

Examination of new social movements that have arisen in response to the crisis of industrial culture, economic restructuring, shifting political formations, and ecological disasters.  The focus is on current theories of social movements in action.  Opportunities for students to gain first-hand experience with social movement organizations through participatory research projects are provided

Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 5100 3.00)

Introduces incoming MES students to a broad range of debates and interdisciplinary perspectives in Environmental Studies as a basis for the preparation of the Initial Plan of Study.

Nature and Society (EU ENVS 5103 3.00)

Examination of conceptions of nature found in the Western tradition.  A particular emphasis is placed on the role of cultural narratives, and notions of technology and time in shaping our conceptions of nature.

Critical Perspectives on Race, Gender and Environment (EU ENVS 5106 3.00)

Overview of the basic concepts and approaches of feminist analysis, with particular attention to feminist theory and its relevance to environmental issues. The course also examines gender, i.e. hierarchical distinctions between male and female, and conforming or non-conforming genders and sexualities, in its intersections with racism, capitalism and colonialism.

Ecology In Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 5112 3.00)

Introduction to concepts and principles in ecology as they relate to both natural and managed environments and to resources, planning, management, and conservation.  Topics are analyzed within the context of ecological change and its implications for both the non-human world and human habitats.

Business Strategies for Sustainability (EU ENVS 5113 3.00)

All organizations impact the natural and social environment. However, it is only recently that sustainability has become a strategic issue for business and its managers. For increasing numbers of companies, sustainability is now an integrated part of organizational strategy formulation and implementation. Through a series of 'live cases', this course is designed to introduce students to the critical strategic and managerial issues in developing, implementing and adapting strategy to create environmental, social and economic value.

Perspectives in Planning (EU ENVS 5121 3.00)

Explores the field of planning in its diverse forms of theory and practice. Focus is on overarching aspects of planning theory and practice and selected themes of significance to planning in the Greater Toronto Area.

Development and Global Inequalities (EU ENVS 5124 3.00)

Survey of the evolution of development theory over the past three decades.  Economic, social, political, and environmental ideas are discussed in relation to the process of development in both northern Canada and the Third World.

Understanding Youth Homelessness: Its Causes and Conditions, and What We can Do About it (EU ENVS 5135 3.00)

"Youth homelessness is a seemingly intractable problem in Canada.  On any given night about 6000 young people experience homelessness, and over a year this number swells to between 35-40,000. To tackle the problem, we must begin by recognizing that youth homelessness is distinct from adult homelessness in terms of it causes and conditions, and therefore so must be the solutions.  In this course, we explore the issue of youth hopelessness in Canada, in order to understand the experiences of a marginalized group of young people, how we have responded to the problem, and how we might work differently to have a significant impact on solutions.  In particular we will explore the potential role of education and schools in addressing youth homelessness.

Perspectives on Green Business (EU ENVS 5150 3.00)

Provides a basic overview of the main perspectives on, and issues related to, green enterprise. Key concerns include eco-production in food, energy & manufacturing; regenerative finance; sustainability indicators; green market creation; eco-regulation; and strategic priorities for big and small businesses.

Local Government Organization and Operation (EU ENVS 5161 3.00)

Examination of the political, governmental and administrative contexts for public policy, planning, and implementation.  Emphasis is on local government in Canada, relationships of municipalities to other governmental levels, and the role of various actors (citizens, voluntary groups, planners, developers,

government agencies) in municipal governance.

Environmental Economics (EU ENVS 5164 3.00)

Introductory examination of pollution, resource depletion, and social deprivation from a critical/historical economic viewpoint.  Emphasis is on basic theory, analytical methods, and policy applications, comparing and contrasting environmental and ecological economics.  No background in economics is required.

Environmental Policy I: Institutions, Ideas and Interests (EU ENVS 5178 3.00)

Examines the development and implementation of public policies related to the environment and sustainability in a Canadian context. The course focuses on the interaction of institutions, societal forces and ideas in the Canadian environmental policy experience.

Ethics and Spirit: Introduction to Philosophy, Religions and the Environment (EU ENVS 5191 3.00)

This course is an introduction to environmental philosophy, with a special focus on religious and spiritual traditions. The main emphasis is on the major ethical traditions including environmental ethics, but concepts of Nature, power, the body, and animal/human relations will also be of concern.

Space, Place and Capitalism: Themes in Historical-Geographical Materialism (EU ENVS 5475 3.00)

This course examines the political economy of capitalism from a geographical angle. It looks at the spatial and environmental aspects of capitalism employing Marx=s >mature= works as well as more contemporary literature on political economy in geography and cultural studies.

Nature and Society in the Industrial World: Global Environmental History since Industrialization (EU ENVS 5543 3.00)

This course examines the relationships between people and their environments from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century. It considers the global ecological consequences of industrialization and the growing human footprint on Earth from a historical perspective, drawing from the field of environmental history.

Special Topics in Environmental Studies (EU ENVS 6101 3.00)

TBA

Special Topics in Environmental Studies: Ecosystem Approaches to Health Field Course (EU ENVS 6101C 3.00)

Ecosystem approaches to health (ecohealth) is an emerging field that addresses health and wellbeing, recognising that these are embedded within an ecosystem context. The purpose of this course is to cultivate knowledge, skills and attitudes which will enhance the participants' ability to contribute to research, theory, education, policy and the practice of ecosystem approaches to health.

MES Research Proposal (EU ENVS 6102 3.00)

This course assists students in the transition from MES II to MES III, with emphasis on the design of the substantive and integrative experiences to be undertaken in MES III (including expectations of the Major Project, Major Paper, or Thesis) and the ways that students may demonstrate “mastery” of the subject matter.

Landscape Ecology and Restoration (EU ENVS 6108 3.00)

Landscape ecology involves the interaction between spatial pattern and Ecological processes. The course provides knowledge of the principles of landscape ecology and links them with physical planning, the design of ecologically sustainable landscapes and the restoration of degraded environments. It is recommended that students have ENVS 5112 3.0 Ecology in Environmental Studies.

Biological Conservation (EU ENVS 6112 3.00)

Examination of the ways in which biological conservation is defined, understood, and acted upon; identification of the causes of biological depletions and of the multidisciplinary nature of both issues and problems.  Special attention is paid to the relationship between the theory and practice of conservation.

Ecological Economics (EU ENVS 6115 3.00)

Exploration in the emerging field of ecological economics, including discussion of: the optimal scale of the economy in relation to the environment, environmental valuation, measurement, risk, and discounting; intergenerational and interspecies equity; entropy/ thermodynamics; and community-based economics.

Resource Management Law (EU ENVS 6116 3.00)

N/A

Ecologies and Sustainability in the Global South (EU ENVS 6117 3.00)

This course takes ecological (or systemic) approaches from diverse epistemologies to aid in the critical exploration of conservation, resource management, sustainable development and social justice issues in the Global South. The focus of the course is directed at discerning the complex factors that contribute to environmental degradation and social injustice, and at evaluating options that address these problems in search of improved social and environmental well-being.

Applied Ecology (EU ENVS 6118 3.00)

Application of ecological knowledge and principles to problems of resource management, planning, pollution and conservation.

Environmental Resource Management (EU ENVS 6119 3.00)

Examination of the principles of environmental resource management and conservation, with emphasis on integrating ecological/physical, economic, and social/ethical considerations in contemporary problems in environmental resource management.

Public Involvement And Planning (EU ENVS 6120 3.00)

Overview of theories of public participation, and consideration of methods and techniques relevant to planning issues and problems of citizen involvement in planning practice.

Community, Energy & Planning (EU ENVS 6121 3.00)

Examines the relationship between sustainable communities and sustainable energy systems. In the context of climate change, environmental, ethical, and social concerns, the course considers the flexibility and adaptability of landscape, communities and city-building processes, and integrated and multi-scalar responses and approaches to policy-making and implementation.

Urban-Regional Planning: International and Comparative Perspectives (EU ENVS 6124 3.00)

Introduction to planning for urban centres and regions.  Emphasis is on the history of urban  regional planning thought and practice, key planning models and concepts, the planning process, and plan implementation

Community Planning and Housing (EU ENVS 6126 3.00)

Explores the evolving nature of community planning and the linkages among planning, housing policy and programs, and planning for the provision of social services and infrastructure in a multicultural society.

Community Organizing and Development (EU ENVS 6127 3.00)

Description coming soon

Urban Transportation Planning (EU ENVS 6128 3.00)

This course focuses on the strategic relationships between land use planning, the environment, economy and transportation planning policies, principles and practices. The course focuses on the interaction of key actors, institutions, policy processes, strategies and techniques relating to transportation planning. Topics include reducing auto dependence, the role of public transit and alternatives modes of transportation in the Canadian transportation planning approach. Prerequisites: Completion of, or concurrent registration in, ES/ENVS 6136 3.00, or permission of the Instructor.

Planning Theory (EU ENVS 6130 3.00)

Critical examination of theories explaining and guiding planning processes, both professional and managerial.

Environmental Planning (EU ENVS 6131 3.00)

Focus is on planned approaches to identifying and resolving environmental problems encountered in human settlements.  Consideration is given to the location, form, pattern and functioning of human communities in relation to the natural environment, as well as to the livability and quality of built environments.

Urban Environmental Design (EU ENVS 6132 3.00)

Examines the role of urban design in creating healthy and equitable urban environments. Social, ecological and economic considerations shaping the urban landscape are studied and provide a basis for a proactive and informed approach to its design.

Social Justice and Planning (EU ENVS 6133 3.00)

Examines the challenges of the pluralistic city and inequalities produced by planning processes. Issues of diversity and difference, migration and plurality, social and spatial justice are discussed in relation to urban planning and design.

Critical Urban Theory: Epistemologies and Politics (EU ENVS 6134 3.00)

This course examines the critical urban theories and theoretical debates that have informed research questions and political orientations in the field of urban studies since the 1960s. Readings include major texts from feminist, post-structural/colonial and Marxist approaches, and debates over the changing natures of local states, political organizations and justice, generated both in Western and non-Western urban contexts. Students are expected to develop faculties of comparing and critically assessing different theoretical approaches.

Health and Environment (EU ENVS 6136 3.00)

An overview of issues in health and environment.  We are defining health broadly in the tradition of the World Health Organization as "the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease." We are defining environment as  natural, built, social, psychological, and organizational.  We will consider these issues from both scientific and activist perspectives

Environmental Education (EU ENVS 6140 3.00)

Examination of ‘Environmental Education' in the widest sense, including definitions of environmental education, and the history of environmental education, its underlying assumptions, and current practices and constraints in its implementation. Alternative visions of a socially critical model of environmental education are explored.

Education, Sustainability and the Ecological Crisis (EU ENVS 6141 3.00)

Description coming soon

Environmental Negotiation and Mediation (EU ENVS 6148 3.00)

Exploration of the concepts and principles of negotiation and mediation, key process requirements, basic techniques and strategies, and constraints and limitations on the application of alternative dispute resolution methods as applied to environmental problems.

Culture and the Environment (EU ENVS 6149 3.00)

Critical exploration into current literature in the emerging field of Cultural Studies. Examination of the discourses through which we attach "culture" to nature, place and space. Particular attention is given to what resources contemporary cultural studies might offer in analysing interactions between culture, nature, and place; between social identity, community, and built and natural environments.

Popular Education for Social Change: I Theory & Practice (EU ENVS 6150 3.00)

Description coming soon

Reshaping Research with Aboriginal Peoples (EU ENVS 6152 3.00)

This course looks at current and historical research from Aboriginal and Indigenous (non-western) perspectives, including ethics, epistemologies, methodologies, protocols, and practices.  It also examines colonial and 'post' colonial research practices by mainstream researchers, publishers, granting agencies, and ethics review boards.

Native/Canadian Relations (EU ENVS 6153 3.00)

Investigation of the relationships between First Nations, their communities and their organizations, and the broader Canadian society and its institutions.  Within this broad framework, selected issues of relevance to First Nations and other stakeholders are examined.

Critical Theory of International Development (EU ENVS 6156 3.00)

Study of theories of development, underdevelopment and maldevelopment in Third World Countries, with stress on the social, economic, political, ideological and ecological bases for development approaches.  Historical and current approaches to the theory of development are presented, and the extent to which they respond to environmental concerns is investigated.

Leadership in Social Sector Management (EU ENVS 6158 3.00)

This course discusses contemporary challenges facing leaders in the social sector in both Canadian and international contexts. The course is suitable for those who wish to develop leadership skills as either a senior manager or a board member. The course is team-taught, involves sectoral speakers and live cases, and offers flexibility in assignments. Prerequisites: All 5100-series Required Foundations of Management Core Courses.

International Environmental Law (EU ENVS 6162 3.00)

Examines the foundations and guiding principles of international environmental law. It explores the dynamics of the international legal system with a focus on the key actors, interests and ideas. Students are expected to contribute actively to the critical analysis of sources and mechanisms of international environmental law and to discussion of new approaches to global environmental problems.

Environmental Law (EU ENVS 6164 3.00)

Examination of the institutions, processes, and legal principles which encompass the field of environmental law in Canada.  A comprehensive review of the legal framework underlying the existing planning, regulatory and approvals processes at both the federal and provincial levels is provided, together with discussions of a number of key environmental issues facing society today.  Comparative approaches undertaken by other jurisdictions are also discussed.

Land Use Planning Law (EU ENVS 6165 3.00)

Description coming soon

Gender and Public Policy (EU ENVS 6170 3.00)

This course stresses women's relationship to the state. Through feminist critiques, it explores ways in which women's issues and concerns move onto the public policy agenda. While emphasizing the links between theory and practice, the course allows students to focus on specific policy domains. The intersecting influences of race, class, gender and sexual orientation on policy concerns are reflected both in the readings and in the analytic approaches to seminar topics.

Food Policy Development in Canada (EU ENVS 6172 3.00)

Explores the theories, concepts and conundrums of food policy development in Canada. There is currently no national food policy, so the course examines policy and program options to create a sustainable, equitable and health promoting food system for Canada

Politics and Planning (EU ENVS 6173 3.00)

Planning and politics are considered along a number of dimensions: the ideologies of planning; the role of planning as a selective filter of values and interests in civil society and the local state; planning as a mediator of conflicts between concepts of urban places as ‘economic space' and ‘community space'; planning as the mediating agency of urban growth and decline.

Global Environmental Politics (EU ENVS 6175 3.00)

Advanced exploration of the linkages between the global political system and the world's natural environment.  In particular, the course addresses: history of conceptions of the environment as a political issue in the global arena; theories of international conflict and cooperation with respect to the natural environment; interactions between the current global political economy and the environment; and empirical investigation of key issue areas which illustrate the above concepts.

Environmental Policy Implementation and Evaluation (EU ENVS 6178 3.00)

Examines substantive, procedural and institutional approaches to policy implementation, and mechanisms and methods for policy evaluation in Canada. It is recommended that students have completed GS/ENVS 5178 3.00.

Climate Change: Science and Policy (EU ENVS 6179 3.00)

The purpose of this course is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the causes of climate change and its key policy solutions. The course also aims at providing opportunities to implement practical actions to address the problem.

Environmental Analytics:  Data, Models and Methods (EU ENVS 6182 3.00)

The application of analytics including optimization, simulation, regression, and time series analysis, to problems in environmental studies such as food systems, political change, emergency response systems, and homeless shelter policy. Solutions will be implemented in spreadsheets and statistical software (Excel and R).

Qualitative Research Methods (EU ENVS 6183 3.00)

Examination of the various phases of carrying out research in the field: planning the research project; choosing appropriate methods for data collection; analyzing data and communicating results of research. Emphasis is on analysis and reporting of questionnaire and qualitative data.

Participatory Research Methods (EU ENVS 6184 3.00)

This course is intended to acquaint students with participatory research, its theoretical underpinnings and guiding principles, as well as some of its challenges and limitations.  Students have the opportunity to apply participatory research theory, principles, and skills through assignments and in the community.

Environmental Assessment (EU ENVS 6186 3.00)

The purpose of this course is to provide a critical overview of the theory, practice and key issues pertaining to environmental assessment. Emphasis will be placed on the Canadian context. The objectives include: a) gaining familiarity with the fundamentals of environmental assessment; b) exploring issues pertaining to the practice of environmental assessment; c) exploring substantive issues that may be addressed through environmental assessment; and d) briefly exploring methods and techniques of environmental assessment.

Remote Sensing and Image Processing for Geographical Analysis and Environmental Monitoring (EU ENVS 6188 3.00)

Description coming soon

Management Practices for Sustainable Business (EU ENVS 6191 3.00)

This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the environmental and stakeholder management tools and techniques used by managers. The course considers how these techniques fit together to form management systems and examines their underlying assumptions, approach and role in managerial decision-making. Techniques include environmental management systems and audits; product-life cycle analysis; and design for the environment; social and environmental reporting; sustainability and organizational change and stakeholder approaches to management.

International Political Economy and Ecology Summer School (EU ENVS 6275 3.00)

Description coming soon

Critical Urban Planning Workshop (EU ENVS 6325 3.00)

The workshop investigates recent urban change in selected North American and European cities using an approach that is informed by recent critical planning practices and urban theory. Each year a different topic is selected as the basis for the workshop project.

Environmental Planning Workshop (EU ENVS 6330 3.00)

The workshop examines the context and debates surrounding the environmental future of the Greater Toronto Area in which we live, work, study, and play. The purpose is to allow students an opportunity to observe, critically analyse, and develop environmental plans within an applied setting.

Planning in Toronto Workshop (EU ENVS 6331 3.00)

This project-based course examines current planning and development practices in Toronto. Students learn about complex problems that planners typically need to resolve when dealing with significant development projects in major North American cities.

Cultural Production Workshop: Performance-Based Practice (EU ENVS 6348 3.00)

This workshop combines critical cultural theory and environmental studies with the practice of cultural production. Through analysis of the field of performance and the creative production of testimony, autobiography in performance, students critically explore and develop their own approach to producing such performances. The primary learning experience of the workshop involves the production of a performance or testimonial narrative applying analytical tools, technical skills and creativity.

Cultural Production Workshop (EU ENVS 6349 3.00)

Combines active media analysis with the production of images/text around environmental issues.  Students critically explore the production process through media observations, readings, and audio-visuals, visits to production sites, and interviews with imagemakers.  There are opportunities to develop hands-on skills in photographic or video production.  The central learning experience of the workshop involves a media production applying analytical insights, technical skills, and creativity.

Cultural Production Workshop: Socially Engaged Art (EU ENVS 6350 3.00)

This cultural production course considers socially engaged art and participatory art practices that seek to create social change and transformation. Through a study and analysis of the debates, ethics and issues involved with public engagement, the class collaborates to create socially engaged and/or participatory art projects in public spaces.

Field Workshop in Environmental Studies: Costa Rica (EU ENVS 6399 3.00)

Field Workshop in Environmental Studies: Costa Rica (EU ENVS 6399A 6.00)

Disasters: Concepts and Causes (EU ENVS 6401 3.00)

Examines natural disasters from an interdisciplinary point of view, particularly considering why there seem to be more natural disasters, and how and why decisions made by people create vulnerable communities.

Activist Video-Making (EU ENVS 6481 3.00)

Description coming soon

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6599 3.00)

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6599 6.00)

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6599A 3.00)

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6599B 3.00)

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6599F 6.00)

Experiential Learning (EU ENVS 6699 12.00)

Experiential Learning (EU ENVS 6699 3.00)

Experiential Learning (EU ENVS 6699 6.00)

Experiential Learning (EU ENVS 6699 9.00)

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6699F 6.00)

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6699O 3.00)

Individual Directed Study (EU ENVS 6699P 3.00)

MES/JD Major Research (EU ENVS 7899 0.00)

MES/JD Major Research (EU ENVS 7899 12.00)

MES/JD Major Research (EU ENVS 7899 3.00)

MES/JD Major Research (EU ENVS 7899 6.00)

MES/JD Major Research (EU ENVS 7899 9.00)

M.E.S. Thesis Research (EU ENVS 7999 0.00)

M.E.S. Thesis Research (EU ENVS 7999 12.00)

M.E.S. Thesis Research (EU ENVS 7999 3.00)

M.E.S. Thesis Research (EU ENVS 7999 6.00)

M.E.S. Thesis Research (EU ENVS 7999 9.00)

PhD Research Seminar (EU ENVS 8102 3.00)

This ongoing seminar is designed to assist PhD students in the formulation of their PhD Program Plan, through a comparative examination of research methods and research designs.

Individual PhD Research (EU ENVS 8599 12.00)

Individual research activities in subject areas not addressed in current Environmental Studies course offerings, devised and carried out under the supervision of a faculty member and arranged to suit the requirements of the student's individual PhD Program Plan.

Individual PhD Research (EU ENVS 8599 3.00)

Individual research activities in subject areas not addressed in current Environmental Studies course offerings, devised and carried out under the supervision of a faculty member and arranged to suit the requirements of the student's individual PhD Program Plan.

Individual PhD Research (EU ENVS 8599 6.00)

Individual research activities in subject areas not addressed in current Environmental Studies course offerings, devised and carried out under the supervision of a faculty member and arranged to suit the requirements of the student's individual PhD Program Plan.

Individual PhD Research (EU ENVS 8599 9.00)

Individual research activities in subject areas not addressed in current Environmental Studies course offerings, devised and carried out under the supervision of a faculty member and arranged to suit the requirements of the student's individual PhD Program Plan.

Geography 5010 3.0: Seminar in Geographical Practice  The Seminar in Geographical Practice engages students with the breadth of geographical research through engagement with the Geography colloquium speakers.  Students analyse the seminars and readings provided by the invited speakers with respect to concepts, methodology, and geographical practice.  

Geography 5011 1.0: Graduate Colloquium. This course requires the submission of a satisfactory thesis or research paper proposal to the student's supervisory committee. An oral presentation will also be required. These will be graded on a pass/fail basis.  

Geography 5015 3.0: Remote Sensing and Image Processing for Geographical Analysis and Environmental Monitoring. This course focuses on ways remote sensing systems are used to acquire data, how these data are analysed and how the information is used in studies of natural and produced environments. Special emphasis is placed on satellite sensors operating in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum (Landstat TM and SPOT), and on airborne and spaceborne radar systems. In addition to learning the characteristics of the sensors, how they record data and how the data are processed, the students will analyse these data using digital processing techniques. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4440 3.0. Same as Environmental Studies 6188 3.0.

Geography 5025 3.0: Research Design and Formulation in Human Geography. Approaches to the identification of research topics/problems are discussed in the context of recent research in human geography, as well as the implications of subjective choice processes for research design. The participants develop their own individual research proposals, but emphasis is placed on the generic properties of any research design when it is located in appropriate sociopolitical contexts, and the presentation, dissemination and utilization of the research project.

Geography 5050 3.0: Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Spatial Analysis. An advanced GIS course which will deal with strategies and processes for spatial analysis and modeling in geography. It will cover database construction, georeferencing, map integration, spatial decision-making support, geostatistics, and system integration. The course will focus on spatial analysis and modeling to geographical problems including natural resource management, mineral potential mapping, environmental impact assessment, hydrological modeling, and site selection. ARC/INFO and ArcView GIS programs will be used for hands-on exercises. This course will assume knowledge of basic statistics and GIS. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4340 3.0.

Geography 5051 3.0: Spatial Analysis in Geography. This course introduces methods for analyzing, interpreting, and making inference from spatial data. Concepts including random fields, covariance structures, spatial autocorrelation, clustering, tessellation, boundary identification, and interpolation are taught in a practical manner, providing experience with real and simulated data. Pre-requisites:          GIS and/or remote sensing, introductory statistics, and permission from the instructor.  Some knowledge of the statistical software, R, would be an asset.

Geography 5201 3.0, 5202 3.0, 5203 1.5, 5204 1.5, 5205 1.5, 5206 1.5: Selected Topics in Critical Human Geography. Topics include concepts of citizenship, place and identity, literary landscapes, postmodernity and postcolonialism, Canadian settlement, landscape, urban historical geography, exploration, ethnicity, segregation, spatial choice models, third world urban development, gender and the city, urban and regional labour markets, urban social and political geography, and the structure of systems of cities.

Geography 5107 3.0: Citizenship, Identity and Space. This course explores the relationship between citizenship and collective and individual identities, focusing on the formation of these identities and their struggle for recognition in different historical epochs from Ancient Greece to the Modern era. Same as Social & Political Thought 6318 3.0 and Sociology 6791 3.0.

Geography 5205 3.0: Special Topics in Critical Human Geography. Topics vary from year to year. Students should consult the program for more detailed information regarding the seminars being offered.Note: This course is only open to Geography graduate students with the permission of the Graduate Program Director in Geography.

Geography 5208 3.0: Doctoral Seminar in Critical Human Geography. An advanced seminar which examines current approaches to studying critical human geography, drawing on recent books and articles framed in both the humanities and the social science traditions. Seminars led by several different faculty members introduce students to current research styles, conceptual approaches, and substantive issues in critical human geography.

Geography 5209 3.0: Masters Seminar in Critical Human Geography. This seminar for master’s students introduces current approaches to studying critical human geography, drawing on recent books and articles framed in both the humanities and the social science traditions. Seminars led by several different faculty members examine current research styles, conceptual approaches, and substantive issues in critical human geography.

Geography 5260 3.0: Geography of Disability. This course examines the embodied experience and social construction of disability in relation to the production and development of built space. Issues to be addressed include: a historical analysis of the social space of disability; the environment of community care and independent living; urban/rural experiences of disability; policy and concepts of urban planning; transportation and accessibility regulation. Same as Critical Disability Studies 5070 3.0.

Geography 5314 3.0: Cultures of Cities: Planning, Policy, and Practice.  This course critically examines the role of cities and suburbs in the Global North and Global South as centres of cultural production, cultural consumption, innovation, creativity, and arts activism.

Geography 5320 3.0: Geographies of Industry in a Neoliberal Era. This course is concerned with economic processes that govern the location of industry, and with recent changes in those processes that have altered patterns of industrial location at the urban, regional and global scale. Behavioural and organizational factors are then introduced to broaden the interpretation. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4220 3.0.

Geography 5325 3.0: Cultural Politics of Environment and Development II: Environmental Justice. Increasingly, the natural environment is a contested site of local, national, and global struggles over resources, livelihoods, representations, and meanings. The contending claims over resources, competing interpretations of environmental change, environmental movements worldwide, and a revived focus on racialized and gendered forms of ecological knowledge describe the highly politicized nature of ecological conflicts. This is the second part of a two course sequence addressing the intersections in the cultural politics of environment and international development. Topics include environmental justice movements in both northern and southern settings, globalization and environment, post-Marxist political ecology, environmental history, the state in political ecology, environment and violence, and the social construction of space. Same as Social Anthropology 5190 3.0

Geography 5326 3.0: Critical Political Ecologies.  This course explores how power and knowledge shape intertwined social and ecological relationships, drawing on theoretically-informed ethnographies and other empirical studies, with an emphasis on global south research. Same as Social Anthropology 5030 3.0. Same as Sociology 6312 3.0

Geography 5327 3.0: Matters of Nature: Theories and Politics of Social Natures. This course critically engages with the vast and growing body of work in anthropology, geography, and science studies that addresses the discursive and material contours of society –nature relations in historically situated and geographically diverse sites. Same as Social Anthropology 5195 3.0

Geography 5330 3.0: Feminist Geographies of Space and Place. This course examines developments in feminist geography over the last two decades. Particular attention will be given to studies of the construction and representation of gendered identities in specific places as well as the role of place in the constitution of those identities.

Geography 5335 3.0: Geographies of Organized Labour: Worker Struggles in Contemporary Economic Landscapes. This course explores the contemporary struggles of workers and their institutions to remain relevant actors in the making of economic landscapes. The central theme is the dynamic and multi-scalar nature of organized labour’s response to aggressive and increasingly mobile capital. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4800 3.0.

Geography 5350 3.0: Geographies of Immigration, Ethnicity and Race in the City. Geographies of migration and settlements have become increasingly complex over the course of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. This course discusses several overarching issues related to migration and resettlement, including policy at multiple scales, identity and social change, economic pressure and opportunity, processes of urbanization, and political violence. Several specific examples are studies in depth, drawn from around the world but with an emphasis on Canadian urban regions.

Geography 5355 3.0: Seminar in Political Geography: Spaces of Power and the Politics of Space. This course examines contemporary themes in political geography, focusing on the ways in which power and political processes are both shaped by and shape particular spaces, scales, networks, and other spatial relations. Prerequisites: graduate student standing or instructor permission.

Geography 5360 3.0: Geographies of Globalization and Development. This course examines the ways in which developing areas are being integrated into a globalizing world economy. The course explores: the discursive power of globalization and development as concepts; the flows of commodities, capital and people that integrate global space; and, the multiple scales at which the global economy is constituted.

Geography 5370 3.0: Space, Power and the City. This course explores the linkages among the geographies of inequalities, state policies and civil society.  We will review a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches that uncover the contested meaning of social policy and interrogate the nature of power in the city. The geographies of critical race theory, colonialism, and the legacies of imperial systems in the production of urban space are explored. Questions of concern relate to: how are marginal groups discriminated in the city?  Is the urban form and design of cities exclusionary in nature?  How do societies collectively struggle and negotiate for social welfare that is in need of an equitable, socially just and cohesive citizenry?  The inherent spatialities and tensions between rationality and power, recognition and redistribution, subjugation and contestation are central themes of the course.

Geography 5375 3.0: Space, Place and Capitalism: Themes in Historical-Geographical Materialism. This course examines the political economy of capitalism from a geographical angle. It looks at the spatial and environmental aspects of capitalism employing Marx’s ‘mature’ works as well as more contemporary literature on political economy in geography and cultural studies. Same as Environmental Studies 5475 3.0. Sociology 6794 3.0.

Geography 5395 3.0: International Political Economy and Ecology Summer School. The Graduate Program in Political Science, Graduate Program in Geography and the Faculty of Environmental Studies jointly hold an annual summer school in the month of June or July where an issue within the field of international political economy and ecology has been explored under the guidance of York faculty members and guest scholars with particular expertise. Students are drawn from our graduate program, from other Canadian universities and from abroad. Each session consists of a lecture course and an associated workshop. Successful completion of the summer school will serve as a credit towards a student’s MA or PhD program. Previous summer schools have focused on the ecology of post-Fordism, global finance, economic restructuring and the world city. Same as Political Science 6282 3.0, Environmental Studies 6275 3.0

Geography 5580 3.0: Global Cities. This course offers an introduc­tion to the literature on global cities and a systematic review of a distinct field of research in urban studies which concerns itself with the globalization of a network of global or world cities.Same as Environmental Studies 5023 3.0.

Geography 5600 3.0: Research Seminar in Physical Geography. This course examines current major research issues in physical geography and related disciplines, drawing on recent books and articles recognized as major contributions. Students will be introduced to current research styles, conceptual approaches, and substantive issues that inform research in physical geography.

Geography 5602 3.0: Climatology of High Latitudes. Climate change is occurring most rapidly in high latitude environments and will impact on polar biophysical systems directly. Polar regions also regulate planetary temperature and perturbations will feed back and magnify global changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, tempera­ture, precipitation and sea level. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4205 3.0.

Geography 5607 3.0: Ecological Climatology.  Ecological Climatology provides an interdisciplinary framework for understanding how terrestrial ecosystems function in relation to climate systems. It examines the physical, chemical and biological processes by which landscapes affect and are affected by climate. The central focus is that ecosystems, through their cycling of energy, water, chemical elements and trace gases are important determinants of climate. The coupling between climate and vegetation is seen at spatial scales from the leaf to biomes and at timescales from seconds to millennia. Both natural vegetation dynamics and human induced land-use changes are mechanisms of climate change. The course combines a theoretical understanding of ecological climatology with applied experimentation to reinforce the principals involved. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4215 3.0.

Geography 5608 3.0: Hydrometeorology: Evapotranspiration Evaporation consumes the largest proportion of precipitation falling to the Earth’s surface with only residual water available for all human and ecosystem uses. The latent energy generated by evaporation drives the atmospheric hydrological cycle and forms the basis of many weather phenomena. The course examines the factors controlling evaporation, the turbulence and energy budget models used to generate evaporation estimates and the instrumentation required for its measurement. The potential impacts of climate change and land use change on evaporation and the water budget is examined. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4210 3.0.

Geography 5610 3.0: Biogeochemistry of Stream Ecosystems. An examination of major aspects of mineral element transport and transformation in stream environments. Topics considered include interactions between hydrology and water chemistry, impacts of human activities on water quality, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in rivers and the effects of pollution on stream organisms. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4200 3.0.

Geography 5630 3.0: Physical Hydrology and Water Resources. Students develop a sound, quantitative sense of the way in which water moves through the land phase of the hydrologic cycle. This serves as the basis for discussions of “hot” water issues (global change, scaling up procedures, land-surface schemes, and inter-basin transfers). Students also learn some hydrological modelling techniques and should have some knowledge of a programming language. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4400 3.0.

Geography 5645 3.0: Dynamics of Snow and Ice. In this course the occurrence and distribution, formation and degradation and the environmental consequences of snow, lake, river and sea ice are examined. Additional components of the cryosphere such as massive ice, ground ice and glaciers will be discussed. Physical processes and fieldwork are emphasized in the course. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4310 3.0.

Geography 5695 3.0: Fluvial Geomorphology. This course concentrates on processes of erosion, sediment transport, and resultant depositional features in alluvial channels. The material is divided into three major sections. The first is concerned with the hydraulics and mechanics of open channel flow. The second examines flow-sediment interaction and bedload transport processes. The third deals with form and process associated with channel cross-sections and channel patterns. Integrated with the undergraduate course Geography 4600 3.0.

Geography 5700 3.0: The Making of Asian Studies: Critical Perspectives. This course offers a historical examination of the multiple, overlapping processes through which Asian identities and regions were constituted. It also examines new directions in Asian studies in an era of intensified global flows, transnationalism, and the presence of Asian diaspora in Canada and elsewhere. Same as  Humanities 6135 3.0, Sociology 6745 3.0, Anthropology 5500 3.0, Communication and Culture 6536 or 6136 3.00, History 5480 3.0.

Geography 6010 0.0: MA/MSc Research Paper. No course credit.

Geography 6050 3.0: MA/MSc Directed Reading Course. An independent directed reading course on a topic approved by the supervisory committee and the Graduate Program Director in Geography. This course may complement the reading required for the literature review of a thesis/major research paper, but will not in toto constitute the reading required for the thesis/major research paper.

Geography 6060 3.0: PhD Directed Reading Course. An independent directed reading course on a topic approved by the supervisory committee and the Graduate Program Director in Geography. A reading course may complement the reading undertaken for the comprehensive examination, but will not in toto constitute the reading required for that examination. Graduate Diploma in Asian Studies’ Core Course

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