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Mark Terry among six York U faculty members appointed to the Royal Society of Canada

Mark Terry among six York U faculty members appointed to the Royal Society of Canada

Six York University faculty members have been elected to The Royal Society of Canada (RSC) as part of the Class of 2020. Recognition by the RSC is the highest honour an individual can achieve in the Arts, Social Sciences and Sciences. Five faculty members were elected to the rank of Fellow in the RSC and one to the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. All were elected by their peers for their outstanding scholarly, scientific and artistic achievement.

Royal SocietyElected to The Royal Society as Fellows are York Professors Molly Ladd-Taylor, Department of History, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies (LA&PS); William Wicken, Department of History, (LA&PS); John Greyson, Department of Cinema & Media Studies, School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design; Faculty of Science Dean Rui Wang, professor, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science; and Mark Terry, contract faculty, Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change and Research Associate, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research. Elected to the College of New Scholars is Benjamin Berger, Osgoode Hall Law School.

“York is delighted to see that Professors Berger, Greyson, Ladd-Taylor, Terry, Wang and Wicken have been recognized by the Royal Society of Canada,” said Amir Asif, vice-president research & innovation. “These exceptional researchers embody our vision to enhance our impact on the social, economic, culture and overall well-being of the communities we serve.”

Mark Terry

Mark Terry

Mark Terry is a contract faculty member in the Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change and a Research Associate at Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research. Terry is an internationally recognized digital media innovator. His remediation of the documentary film known as the Geo-Doc is currently being used within various divisions of the United Nations as a data delivery system, a new communications tool that bridges the gap between science and policy. His pioneering work with multilinear, non-fiction narratives has been recognized by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television with their Humanitarian Award in 2011. His work in documenting polar research has also been recognized by decorations with the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal (2013) and The Explorers Club’s Stefansson Medal (2010).

 

 

 

With files from YFile. See full article here.

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