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Graduate Programs

The Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change is home to two graduate programs, Environmental Studies and Geography, both of which offer Master's degrees and the PhD, as well as two graduate diplomas.

Our graduate degree programs are designed to train and empower diverse thinkers through multi-disciplinary approaches and hands-on learning opportunities to make positive change.

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Programs

Environmental Studies (MES, MES-Planning, MES/JD, & PhD)

Our Environmental Studies graduate degree programs build on an interdisciplinary approach to the environment in which the social sciences, humanities, arts, and natural sciences meet and inform each other. 

Individualized programs engage in an extensive array of environmental concerns, approaches, and actions.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Geography (MA, MSc, PhD)

Join one of Canada’s leading graduate programs in Geography. 

With an international reputation for critical scholarship, York Geography is a leader in migration and settlement, urban geography, political economy and political ecology, feminist geography, and the physical geography of northern and extreme environments.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN GEOGRAPHY

Graduate Research Spotlights

We are committed to mobilizing knowledge for a just and sustainable future in all our programs. In our research-intensive environment, our graduate students are conducting world-class, innovative and dynamic research projects and studies. We welcome you to explore their work as same examples of these student research accomplishments. 

Toronto, Dundas Street

Studentification of West Chinatown

The University of Toronto St. George Campus (UTSG) borders on a number of historic neighbourhoods that continue to house communities of artists, students, families, seniors, and immigrants. West Chinatown in particular serves as one of the last immigrant landing communities in Downtown Toronto that offers affordable culturally appropriate foods, professional services, employment, housing, and a sense of community. 

READ THE RESEARCH PAPER

Tying Indigenous and non-Indigenous worldviews to enhance environmental decision making

What is humanity’s relationship to water and efforts on improvement for humans, animals, and the waters themselves? How does Anishinaabek law construct the role of women in decision making about water? How does Anishinaabek law understand the relationship between water and memory? What responsibilities do humans have under Naaknigewin (law/Anishinaabek legal traditions)? Can the broader discourse in Canada about reconciliation assist with improving relationships to water? 

READ THE RESEARCH PAPER

Canoeing
3 candles next to a t-shirt with the word Justice

Grassroots women leaders practise community-based disaster management in the Philippines

What is a disaster? What are the root causes and material manifestations of vulnerability? What is well-being and what efforts do community leaders and civil society engage in as front-line responders to disasters? These are the questions that PhD doctoral candidate, Chaya Go asked in her doctoral dissertation on A Feminist Political Ecology of Disasters in the Philippines.

READ THE RESEARCH PAPER