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The Faculty of Environmental & Urban Change (EUC)

Changemakers for a Just and Sustainable Future

York University’s new Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change has been created as a call to action to respond to the most pressing challenges facing people and the planet. 

As a community, we believe that making positive change requires bold and diverse thinking, ambitious action, and community engagement. We are research intensive, student centric, inclusive and devoted to making the world a better place for all.

Join us as we strive to create a more just and sustainable future!

Why Study with Environmental & Urban Change at York University?

We are focused on ensuring our students receive a high quality education in our programs, providing knowledge, skills and training to support their future endeavors. We offer students a unique learning experience a supportive and inclusive learning environment that is focused on bringing hands-on experiences and opportunities to interact with employers and community partners into all of our courses.

As the smallest Faculty in the 4th largest University in Canada, we offer exclusive career development services, financial assistance & scholarships and one-on-one advising for all EUC students. 

LEARN MORE ABOUT EUC

Poster with There is no planet B sign | Illustrative image for Environmental Program

Our Programs

We empower, educate and train future changemakers through innovative and hands-on programs for graduate and undergraduate study. Our new programs will empower students with fundamental knowledge, critical thinking skills, hands-on experience, and global perspective to become problem solvers, policymakers, planners, and leaders. 

READ MORE ABOUT OUR PROGRAMS

Our People

We bring together world class scientists and scholars who are producing research on the climate crisis, biodiversity loss, intensive urbanization and how these dynamics impact the most vulnerable among us. Our professional and supportive administrative staff offer students, alumni and community partners unique and dynamic opportunities to learn and to collaborate for positive change.

READ MORE ABOUT OUR PEOPLE

Divers hands holding plants and seedlings. Illustrative image for Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change

EUC Impact Report 2022-2023

We are proud to share with you our inaugural EUC IMPACT REPORT that demonstrates the substantive and meaningful impact we have achieved in our first three years. We are empowering change through our academic programs, research excellence, and engagement activities.

READ THE FULL IMPACT REPORT

Transportation apps can help people with disabilities navigate public transit but accessibility lags behind

July 12, 2023 Mahtot Gebresselassie Smartphone apps have become commonplace tools for travel and navigation. As technology becomes more integrated into transport networks, apps will continue to be indispensable. But many of those apps remain inaccessible to those with various disabilities.

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How food insecurity affects people’s rights to choose whether or not to have children

By JASMINE FLEDDERJOHANN - MAUREEN OWINO - SOPHIE PATTERSON PUBLISHED JUNE 1, 2023 Food insecurity - difficulties getting enough nutritious food for a healthy life — is a growing problem globally. It has been linked to many health and social problems including malnutrition, difficulties managing diabetes, impaired development in

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An Introduction to Queer Ecology

Air Date: Week of June 23, 2023 Below is the transcript for the podcast, "An Introduction to Queer Ecology" Transcript DOERING: It’s Living on Earth, I’m Jenni Doering. O’NEILL: And I’m Aynsley O’Neill. June is Pride Month in the United States,

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Ecosystem productivity responses in the Bruce Peninsula over the past 20 years

Lord-Emmanuel Achidago at Bruce Peninsula by Lord-Emmanuel Achidago IntroductionThe Bruce Peninsula, renowned for its expansive forest and UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve designation, faced a significant setback with a major wildfire in 1908. Since then, vegetation regrowth has led to the

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Homeland return visits by Ghanaian immigrants in Canada

by Vivien J. Bediako Vivien J. Bediako What is home? What does home mean to you? Do you have a special affinity and attachment to your homeland? Do you visit Ghana purely as a tourist destination or as visiting home?

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Exploring the intersection of public space planning and the neoliberal thrust of tourism development in the Caribbean

by Nastassia Pratt Nastassia Pratt My major research paper, “Placemaking as a Public Space Planning Tool in New Providence, Bahamas,” critically explores the intersection of public space planning and the neoliberal thrust of tourism development in the Caribbean region. Small

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Alumni Spotlights

Image of Adeye Adane

BES ‘20

Adeye Adane

Social Support Worker Centre, 454 - A Ministry of the Anglican Diocese of Ottawa

“Take advantage of Student Counselling, Health & Well-being services. There are many resources available to students, ask questions and advocate for yourself, because there are staff and faculty who will help you along the way.”

Read Adeye's profile

Michael John Long sitting on a chair near a lake.

MES ‘08

Michael John Long

Contract Faculty Professor, George Brown College

"EUC allows for the ability to explore and amalgamate interests in a way that leads to personalized and inspired careers, and does so among a community of people that makes it feel like a home. So, lean into that freedom and those connections."

Read Michael's profile

Land Acknowledgement

We recognize that many Indigenous Nations have longstanding relationships with the territories upon which York University campuses are located that precede the establishment of York University. York University acknowledges its presence on the traditional territory of many Indigenous Nations. The area known as Tkaronto has been care taken by the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, and the Huron-Wendat. It is now home to many First Nation, Inuit and Métis communities. We acknowledge the current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. This territory is subject of the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement to peaceably share and care for the Great Lakes Region